Make your own free website on Tripod.com

 

July 19, 2002

Freeport Maine's Andy Spaulding took first place in 25:13 at the 1st Annual Oxford Hills 8K Run to the Lake on Sunday, July 14, and earned himself $150 at the same time. Tina Meserve of Livermore, Maine edged out Christine Snow-Reaser to take first place for the women, also earning $150. Meserve crossed the line in 29:35, 17th overall, and Snow-Reaser ended the day with a 19th place finish overall in 29:44 and collected $125. Two Milers dueled it out for most of the race with Madison's Paul Kirsch just edging out Joe Fay. Kirsch finished in 35:29; Paul, you might recall, had a great race at Mount Washington this year.  Fay ended the day with a time of 35:11 and took home second place in the 50-59 age group. His last race was Bridgton on July 4 where he made a strong showing despite the trying conditions. Kearsarge's Steve Moose Dowling was bearing down on Smokin' Joe the whole race and came up short but finished strongly behind Fay to take third place in the 50-59 age group with a time of 38:16. Miler John Howe, not to be outdone by these younger Milers, took first place in the 65-69 age group, coming across in 39:00. John's wife Debbie placed third in her age group making a strong showing for the Howe clan from Waterford, Maine. 

Local runners included: 28. AJ Viens, 34:34; 32. Paul Kirsch, 35:29; 33. Smokin' Joe Fay, 35:31; 37. Bob Wentworth, 37:06; 40. Steve Moose Dowling, 38:16; 42. Virginia Howe, 38:46; 43. John Howe, 39:00; 45. Diane Betz, 39:27; 57. Carol Viens, 43:39; 67. Carlton Mendell, 50:52; 69. Marcia Uhl, 57:26; 70. Debbie Howe, 59:23. 

Thank you to Steve Moose Dowling and Paul Kirsch for reminding me about this first annual race in Norway. All 73 finishers went away happy. It was one of the most talented fields for a race on both the men's and women's side. Nineteen runners ran under a six-minute pace. Prize money went five deep in the open division ($150, $125, $100, $75, and $50), three deep in the masters ($75, $50, and $25) and the same for the top three Oxford Hills' residents. With race entry fees going out of sight (that's for another column sometime soon), it was great to see the $8 entry, pre or post, for a race that was as well organized as any I've run. I even heard talk that the organizers want to bid to make this become the 8K stop for the New England Grand Prix Race Series. That would be a coup for them. They have my vote; I expect to be back next year.

Margaret Phillips and Joe Fay took top honors at the predict-your-time White Mountain Milers 18th Annual I’ll be Dipped Run on Tuesday, July 16. Phillips finished in 50:09, 10 seconds off her predicted time. Smokin' Joe ended up with 39:56, just a mere four seconds off his predicted time of 40:00.  Fastest times of the day on the 5.4-mile course went to Alexandra Hill with a time of 37:25 and Tim Livingston in 31:36. John Renda was the fastest walker, completing the course in 58:16. Rosemary Good was the top walker for the women, finishing in 63:04 Forty-one runners and walkers finished the battle and then had the opportunity to sample all the delicious salads and desserts along with burgers and dogs cooked to perfection by chef Maggie Solomon.  Kudos to Maggie and Linda Eldridge who organized the event. Thank you to Charlene Gray again for hosting the potluck feast at her retreat on Crystal Lake. Thank you also to Bill Murphy and Jim Berry for the water stop and Eileen and Bernie Livingston for the timing and results. It has always been one of my favorite Miler events.


The Key Bank 2002 Mollyockett Day Classic 5-Mile Road Run & Walker Event takes place on Saturday, July 20, in Bethel, Maine. The entry fee on race-day is $12. Walkers and runners start at 9:00 a.m. sharp.  Runners complete a 5-mile course over "a challenging loop including the Paradise Hill Challenge, a favorite of local runners." Walkers race a 3-mile loop. There is also a 1-mile race for kids that starts at 8:30 a.m. For more information, call (207) 824-2282.  (See the events page for the full calendar).


"What gives? I want to hear more gossip, lies, and rumors. I especially want the rumors and lies. When in doubt, make it up. You have to have thick skin to be a Miler, besides it makes you a tougher runner." So, after numerous requests about where it's been, here's the return of the infamous gossip, lies, and rumors; you can expect to see it on an occasional basis. 

It will be a cold day in Kearsarge before the Moose beats me. Yeah, his running streak is now over 200 days straight, but Carlton Mendell ran faster at 52 than the Moose is now. Really though, Kudos to the Moose who is dropping loads of weight and chopping off minutes on his pace per mile that had one female Miler mistaking him for Frank Shorter. Come on Sweetie Pie, that's a stretch. Quote of the day: "It is not the training that's important, it is who is wearing your chip that counts." —Kevin Callahan after eating yet another doughnut, his carbo-loading power food. Is Smokin' Joe Fay really retired? Must be true because this boy is getting fast. Speaking about getting fast, Diane Betz was seen trying on a spandex racing suit. She says, "The fastest chicks wear them and it's just the edge I need. Factor that one in Coach Spam Man. Speaking about Coach, this former Navy boy got seasick while on route from Portland to Nova Scotia. Eileen was considering tossing him overboard for a younger man. What do you think about that, Pat? There's a rumor floating around that outdoor showers in Jackson are banned, too bad Maggie. They're not banned in Albany though.  Before pulling up to the Last Resort, let your presence be known. You might see more than just chickens. Sure Moose, you were only there for the chickens. After carefully examining Jane Chauvin's toe, Gary Howard has concluded that she could not possibly have broken it on a rock in the water at Diana's Baths. It is more likely that she and Marc were practicing the Steve Prefontaine move. Howard said that Marc should make sure he stretches first. That's it for now. I'll keep my eyes and ears open. My sources are out there just waiting for the gossip, lies, and rumors of the runners and walkers of the Valley.


Upcoming races include the 11th Annual Lancaster Street Fair 5K on Saturday, July 27. New this year is a high school division. At the pre-race pasta feed on Friday, July 26, world-renowned marathon coach Bill Squires will speak at 7:30 p.m. following the pasta buffet. I'll have all the particulars about the race next week and more about Squires too. For more information see the calendar in the sidebar

For Results of the 18th Annual I'll be dipped, please see the Race Results page.

Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.


 

July 12, 2002

The White Mountain Milers Annual I’ll be Dipped Run takes place on Tuesday, July 16. Meet in the parking lot behind Laconia Savings Bank in Conway. Sign-up begins at 5:00 p.m. and the run at 5:30 p.m. This is a predict-your-time affair. No time pieces or heart rate monitors are allowed. The course follows Route 153 for five-plus miles and ends in Eaton near the Eaton Village Store. The highlight of the event is the potluck feast that follows. Everyone is asked to bring an item such as salads, main dishes, and desserts of all kinds. The Milers provide the hot dogs, hamburgers, and beverages. Three dollars covers your entry fee. Listen to WMWV for any postponement in case of rain. The potluck meal after the race is held at the lakeside retreat of Charlene Gray. The entrance to the place is opposite the Eaton Village Store. Hosting this year’s event is Maggie Solomon and Linda Eldridge. For more information call Maggie at 383-0852 or Linda at 447-3042.

Hazy and humid weather with the temperature over 80°F made conditions almost unbearable for the 1,180 runners and walkers that challenged themselves at the 26th Annual Bridgton Four on the Fourth Road Race on Thursday, July 4, in Bridgton, Maine. Thirty-one year old Andy Spaulding of Freeport, Maine took first place with a time of 20:28. Spaulding was nowhere near Colin Peddie's course record of 18:46 set in 1987. Kristin Barry, twenty-eight years old, of Arlington, VA, was first for the women in 23:54. The women's record was set in 1987 by Michele Hallet with a time of 21:56. In the men's field, three local runners cracked the top twenty on a day that will go down in the record books for the heat and humidity. Christian Newbold of Fryeburg finished eighth overall with a time of 21:56. White Mountain Milers Tim Livingston and Kevin Tilton finished thirteenth and fourteenth overall. Livingston, twenty-eight years old, came across in 22:08 followed by Tilton, twenty years old, in 22:22. On the women's side, thirty-six year old Mary Meehan Bates of Intervale, NH, was the seventh women to finish, sixty-fourth overall, with a time of 26:37. Next was thirty-seven year old Andrea Masters of North Conway. Masters finished up in seventh place for the women, one hundred twenty-fifth place overall with a time of 29:09. See the sidebar for the complete results of all the local runners and walkers.

Anyone competing in a race this year on July 4, earned and suffered through every mile they completed. My wife Carol and I ran a 10K in Freeport, Maine, on the 4th (more on this one next time). We both agreed that the weather was the most trying we'd experienced in previous July 4th races.

For the Fun of It. There will be no fun run on Tuesday, July 16, at Whittaker Woods. The I'll Be Dipped Run takes its place. Weekly fun runs return on Tuesday, July 23, at 5:30 p.m. Meet at the John Fuller School in North Conway.

The Cranmore Hill Climb will not be held this year. Other commitments and the need for a break to the ponder the future of the race are the main reasons for this decision. Carol and I would like to thank again all the people and sponsors who made this race possible and a success for the past eight years.

Upcoming races include the Mollyockett Day Classic 5-mile Run/Walk on Saturday, July 20. And, don't forget about the new race on the calendar this summer. It's the Brownfield Bicentennial Maine Street Mile on Saturday, August 17, at 9:00 a.m. For more information see the sidebar.

Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.

 

 


July 5, 2002 

Hazy, hot, and humid. What a week it has been for running in the Mount Washington Valley. To top it all off, the air quality has been poor too. If you heed all the warnings from the folks on TV, you'd be better off staying indoors until the weather breaks. But for anyone training to race faster, that's not practical. Then, what do you do? 

Here are some tips to get you through these mini heat waves. 

1. Run in the morning if you can. The coolest temperatures of the day usually occur in the morning, the earlier, the better. I prefer running in the afternoon, but on these hot days, an early morning run is nature's way of air conditioning you on the run. The sun's damaging rays and most intense heat usually occur from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (some reports say from 11 a.m.). 

2. If your schedule permits it, watch the sky and listen to the weather reports and go for a run during a shower. A good shower can drop the air temperature noticeably and there is no finer run in the summer than during a shower. Heed any warning about lightning and postpone that run if it is not safe. 

3. Stay well hydrated during the day; drink, drink, and drink some more. How much should you drink? 

There are all kinds of rules (most of them very similar), but the safest one to follow (I know I'll get jeers again for this one) is to drink enough so that your urine is pale yellow to clear. Remember, if you're already thirsty, you're probably already on your way to being dehydrated.  Articles have recently been appearing in some of the running magazines about the dangers of drinking too much water resulting in a condition called hyponatremia caused by low sodium levels in your blood. Although rare, it does happen and here is how you can avoid it. When you sweat, you lose more than just water, you loose electrolytes (especially sodium) too. On long runs, during tough workouts (that includes racing), or for a person that sweats more than normal, electrolyte levels in your system can go dangerously low. Some of this is caused by an excessive amount of water you drink that dilutes these levels (especially sodium) and by excessive sweating. One way to combat this problem is to monitor your body. Do you sweat excessively? If so, you could be at risk. According to Cathy Fieseler, MD in a recent article she wrote in footnotes, the magazine of the Road Runners Club of America: "People sweat at different rates, ranging from a half quart up to 4 quarts of fluid lost per hour. Several factors determine rate of sweat. Some people have more sweat glands than others, so they produce more of this fluid. Heat and humidity greatly affect the rate at which sweat is produced. Level of fitness also plays a role. As the body adapts to exercise, especially in a warmer environment, it produces greater quantities of sweat during exercise, as an adaptive response to the heat that is produced by exercise." After a long run or tough workout, can you feel a layer of salt that has built up on your face and neck, maybe even your arms and clothing? If so, then that indicates you've probably lost a lot of sodium and need a sports drink instead of just plain water. Drinking plain water alone will only dilute your sodium level even more. Can you still hydrate safety and run with confidence during these times? Sure you can. Keep well hydrated during the day. It is like money in the bank. Thirty to fifteen minutes before you run, drink 10 to 16 ounces of your favorite sports drink. If your run is going to last less than 60 minutes, taking plain water on your run is probably the only thing you'll need, although a sports drink would not hurt you and could help if your energy level is down; the added carbohydrate will boost your energy level especially if you started drinking right away. Five good gulps every 10 to 15 minutes is what I do. Experiment, see what your body needs. If your run is going to last more than an hour, then a sports drink is the best choice. Top off your run by another 10 to 12 ounces of a sports drink and rehydrate yourself with water and other beverages of choice (a general rule of thumb is 16 to 24 ounces for every pound lost as sweat; weigh yourself before and after you run). 

4.  Finally, what you wear can make a difference in comfort. Protect yourself from exposure to the sun with sunscreen and clothing. Although you see many men running shirtless and women wearing only a sports bra, you actually could stay cooler by wearing some of the high-tec fabrics that pull moisture away from your body and then disperse the it throughout the fabric. As the fabric dries, this evaporative process actually keeps your skin cooler. Above all, don't run in cotton. Once it is soaked from sweat, it clings to your body like Saran Wrap® making you feel like a wet noodle. 

Despite the unpleasant conditions that can prevail during the summer running season, there are places far worse off than us. Try running in the Peachtree Road Race in Atlanta in July, the humidity can be so thick that you can cut it with a bread knife. How about a trip up to the summit of Mount Washington to cool off? On Tuesday, the high temperature in North Conway topped out in the low 90s; the high temperature on the Rockpile was around 61° (there was also a 28 mph wind from the northwest lowering the temperature even more). Save some money and use your own power to get up above treeline. It's always cooler there. For that matter, just take a drive up to Crawford or Pinkham Notch, you'll probably notice a 10-12° drop in temperature. That's one way to beat the heat.

The Cranmore Hill Climb will not be held this year. Other commitments and the need for a break to the ponder the future of the race are the main reasons for this decision. Carol and I would like to thank again all the people and sponsors who made this race possible and a success for the past eight years.

The Annual White Mountain Miler I'll Be Dipped Run will take place on Tuesday, July 16. I'll have more about this event next week. 

Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.


June 28, 2002

The summer road racing season kicks off in the Mount Washington Valley with the 26th Annual Bridgton Four on the Fourth Road Race on Thursday, July 4, in Bridgton, Maine. Starting time is 8 a.m. The course is four miles and follows a gradual ascent for the first two and a half miles. The last mile is flat and fast to the finish line. Be prepared for any kind of weather; hot, humid conditions are possible despite the early start. The weather rather than the course usually determines a PR and leaves many runners dreading the heat and humidity of summer racing.


The race benefits various local charities. Long-time race director Jay Spencier has handed over the reins to David and Ann-Marie Fadden. Two new significant changes have resulted. New this year is online registration at www.4onthe4th.com. Entries by snail-mail must be received by July 1. To receive a T-shirt, you had to be registered by June 1. The entry fee this year is the other new thing. The pre and post-entry fee has jumped from $10 and $12 respectively to $20 for either. Registration takes place from 6 to 7:30 a.m. at the Bridgton Memorial School. With the hike in entry fee, it will be interesting to see if last year's record field of 1,311 finishers will be topped in 2002.

The Cranmore Hill Climb will not be held this year. Other commitments and the need for a break to the ponder the future of the race are the main reasons for this decision. Carol and I would like to again thank all the people and sponsors who made this race possible and a success for the past eight years.

If Bridgton is too big for you, then checkout another Maine race on July 4, the 25th Anniversary Running of the L.L. Bean 4th of July 10K Road Race and 1-Mile Family Fun Run/Walk in Freeport. The race starts at 7:30 a.m. on Bow St. at Town Park. Race-registration is $15 for the 10K and $5 for the fun run/walk. Registration takes place from 6 to 7:15 a.m. for the 10K and until 9 a.m. for the fun run/walk. T-shirts are given to the first 700 registrants. An L.L. Bean $100 gift certificate will be awarded to the winners in the men's and women's open division. A special L.L. Bean Field Watch will be awarded to the first man or woman to break the 10K course records. The women's record is 34:03 set in 1988 by Joan Benoit Samuelson, and the men's record is 29:47 set by Steve Spence in 1991. For more information, contact race director Jill Litchfield at 207-552-7223 or e-mail at roadrace@llbean.com.


Apparently there were a few problems with the team sign-ups for the Mount Washington Road Race this year. Tim Livingston was positive that he registered as a White Mountain Miler, but his time was not recorded in the team results. Tim's time was a very respectable 32:39, third among Milers and 32nd overall. See the sidebar for the complete Miler results.

For those of you who contacted me about the Miler Annual I'll Be Dipped Run, I don't have any information to report. The Miler June newsletter had no information either. Last year it was held on Tuesday, July 10; the Tuesday closest to that date this year is July 9. If the event is still on, I hope to have some information next week.

Most runners agreed that the weather was perfect at least to the 4-mile mark for the Mount Washington Road Race this year. After that, I heard mixed reports.  Howie Weymss was correct in not allowing the race to the summit. With icing and the chance of it getting worse, safety for cars was the first concern. Secondly, I heard that the wind would have made it too dangerous for the runners, especially with the wind chill.  Runners slowing down without adequate clothing for the elements could have lead to serious problems for some of the back-of-the-pack people. Another report I heard said that the wind would only have been a factor from the Cow Pasture up and below that it was swirling and sometimes a tailwind and, though it would be a headwind in spots, it would have made for some fast times. What could have been? That's what many running were wondering. I woke up on race-day smiling. For the first time in 10 years it was not going to be too warm to run; clouds and rain, perfect conditions. This year I felt that I was in the best shape in a long time for the race. If you take my time of 47:53, that's 12:46/mile (not especially fast for the day) and at that pace for 7.6 miles, I'd finish with a time of 1:35:46, a fast time for me compared to my slog up the hill last year in 1:52. However, runners passed me that don't usually in this race. Was I slow or fast this year? I'll never know for sure; only the full race would have told me that. Anyone interested in running the full race to the summit of Mount Washington sometime this summer?

Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.


June 21, 2002      
                                                                         
     Twenty year-old Kevin Tilton of Center Conway had the race of his life at the 42nd Annual Mount Washington Road Race on Saturday, June 15. Tilton, coming off a strong season of track for the UNH Wildcats, earned top honors among the White Mountain Milers and other local runners to finish eleventh overall with a time of 30:19. Kevin's 7:59/mile pace was only three seconds slower than former Kennett High Eagle standout Sean Livingston now of Barrington, RI. Sean placed tenth overall with a time of 30:07.  This year's race will have runners guessing forever about what might have been. Both Tilton and Livingston were among the elite top ten that included names like Gutierrez (the overall winner in 28:02); Eric Morse, 28:12; Craig Fram, 28:28; Dave Dunham, 28:58; Daniel Kihara, 29:06 and Nephat Kinyanjui, 29:38, both from Kenya. In fact, Kevin and Sean beat out Zablon Mokaya of Kenya who finished 29th with a time of 32:31. Mokaya stayed with Pat Fry and Gary Howard before the race. After returning to Albany on Saturday, Mokaya found it almost impossible to get warm again after being out in that bone-chilling rain. Howard said that Zablon sat by the fire for nearly two hours. When asked by Gary about the race, Mokaya said, "I never forget Mount Washington for the rest of my life."

     Barbara Robinson, after taking a year off from the race, returned with a vengeance and took first place in the 65-69 age group. Barbara has been recovering from a skiing injury for nearly a year. She just returned to racing this spring at the Ammonoosuc Amble. You can expect to see her next at Bridgton's Four On the Fourth.

     Despite the short course, the White Mountain Milers placed well in the various team divisions: male open: 5th out of 19 teams,  Kevin Tilton, Brendan Sullivan, Rick Copley, Paul Kirsch, Daren Levitt; male masters: 11th out of 14, Howie Wemyss, Will White, Joe Fay, Tony Mullin, Bruce Hill; male seniors: 3rd out of 5, Howie Wemyss, Joe Fay, Phil Ostroski, Larry Garland, John Howe; female open: 5th out of 11, Sue Long, Andrea Masters, Katja Fox; female masters: 2nd out of 8, Sue Long, Laura Mullin, Virginia Howe; female seniors: 2nd out of 2, Barbara Robinson, Sally Swenson, Marianne Jackson.

     Several Milers ran in the 25th Annual Market Square Day 10K Road Race on  Saturday, June 8, in Portsmouth. Milers included: 187. Stephen Whitney, 43:55; 195. Robert Parrish, 44:11; 262. Linda Waitkun, 2nd in her age group, 45:42; 499. Kevin Callahan, 34:02; 1080. Linda Bittner, 1:01:28. Thank you to Bob Parrish for the results.

     Billy Catalucci finished first in his age group at the Foxborough Race Against Diabetes 5K on June 1. Over 700 runners competed and Bill finished 35th overall with a time of 21:56. Folks, the Cat is back!

     Lorraine Tilney had good news to report from the resurrected Covered Bridges Half Marathon on June 2, in Woodstock, VT. Among the Milers competing were: Kirsten Tilney, 2nd in the 20-29 age group and 13th female overall, 1:33:40; Heather Tilney, 2:10:10; Karen Stancik, 2:48:10; Lucille Russo, 2:48:12. Lorraine said, "What a great course. Everyone should do it."

     For the Fun of It. Weekly fun runs are held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. The course winds for 3.1 miles on soft trails through the woods. Walkers and runners of all abilities are invited to meet at the John Fuller School in North Conway. Here's your chance to meet people from all walks of life and abilities who are bound by their common interest in fitness. Weekly fun runs continue throughout the season until the end of October. Thank you to Barb and John Renda for hosting the runs during the month of June.

     Random Thoughts While On the Run. Two new races are in the works. One is a one-mile race scheduled in August in Brownfield, Maine. Billy Reilly is putting that race together. The second new race on the scene is a men's only trail race slated to be run in Intervale in early September. The field will be limited and very competitive. According to race director Gary Howard, the highlight of the race will include river crossings and a pig roast. This one is for boars only. I'll have more information about both of these races in the weeks ahead. Stay tuned.

     On the Track. Bernie Livingston reports that track workouts are now being held on the oval at Fryeburg Academy. Weekly track workouts are held every Thursday at 5:00 p.m.  Anyone interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. If you have any questions, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626.

     Congratulations to all the competitors at Mount Washington this year. A special congratulations goes out to Kevin Tilton, Sean Livingston, and Barbara Robinson. We are especially proud of Kevin.

"The only way I'll ever run Mount Washington again is if a tall, long-legged blonde driving a Harley is the pace vehicle." -Gary Mountain Man Howard. 

 


June 7, 2002

     John Renda of Albany race walked his way to first place at the 24th Annual Jackson Covered Bridge Footrace on Saturday, June 1.  Renda completed the course in 1:03:21, nearly five minutes ahead of the second place walker. Jean McKenna was the first woman to finish, third overall, with a time of 1:09:29. Twenty-nine walkers competed this year.

     Twenty year-old Michele Palmer of Plymouth, Massachusetts, set a new course record in the women's race for runners with a time of 39:35. The old record of 40:15 was set by Summer Harrington in 2000. Cathy Livingston and Mary Meehan Bates battled it out for second and third place with the edge going to Livingston in 43:56. Meehan Bates ended up in third with a time of 45:00. Both have been away from racing for awhile. Mary made her return several weeks ago by taking first place at the 5th Annual Get A Running Start. Age group winners for the women included: Alexandra Hill, 18 & under; Alycia Cavadi, 25-29; Meredith Piotrow, 30 to 34; Cathy Livingston, 35 to 39; Gayle Lemerise, 40 to 44; Linda Waitkun, 45 to 49; Sally Swenson, 50 to 59; Barbara Robinson, 60 to 69.

     Thirty-three year old David Hackworth of Gorham, captured first place for runners with a time of 35:09. Locally, the story of the day
involved the second and third place runners. Kevin Tilton bested Tim Livingston to take second place with a time of 36:26. Although Livingston had Tilton in his sights at the end, he just couldn't make up the difference and ended up in the number three spot with a time of
37:00. Tilton is primed and ready for Mount Washington coming off his best-ever time and place at the Jackson 10K. Larry Sayers's course
record of 34:57 set in 2001 remains the time to beat. Age group winners in the men's race included: Kevin Tilton, 19-24; Tim Livingston, 25-29; Stephen Piotrow, 35 to 39; Ken Kimball, 50 to 59; Carlton Mendell, 70 & up.

     This year's race drew 141 runners and 29 walkers. Kudos to race directors Bruce and Vicki Hill and all their volunteers. Congratulations
to all the runners and walkers that raced.

 For the Fun of It. Weekly fun runs are held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. The course winds for 3.1 miles on soft trails through the woods. Walkers and runners of all abilities are invited to meet at the John Fuller School in North Conway. Here's your chance to meet people from all walks of life and abilities who are bound by their common interest in fitness. Weekly fun runs continue throughout the season until the end of October.

Thank you to Maggie Solomon for hosting the runs during the month of May.

Random Thoughts While On the Run. Was Kevin Tilton solely responsible for beating Tim Livingston on Saturday or did Marc Chauvin have
something to do with it too? Livingston was a no-show at the fun run last Tuesday after coming off a pair of tough workouts. Coach Bernie
Livingston always said to make sure your best performance doesn't take place in training. Yes, that was Cathy Livingston running a race at
Jackson, and Kevin Callahan could not even see her dust. Is Cathy back to stay? The speed demons of Thursday night's track workouts hope so.

     What will the weather bring to the Mount Washington Road Race next Saturday? Whatever it is, it will be the same for everyone. A word of advice from some of the wise men: "Taper, taper, and taper some more. Don't do anything stupid like trying to run the whole course one week before the race. If you do, that might be your fastest time. Cut your mileage, hone your speed with 400 to 800m repeats with plenty of rest in between, and stay hydrated the entire week before." -Bernie Livingston, former head coach of the Miler Racing Team. "Remember, there's only one hill." -Bob Teschek, race director for Mount Washington. "The only way I'll ever run this race again is if a tall, long-legged blonde driving a Harley is the pace vehicle." -Gary Mountain Man Howard.

Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.

 

May 31, 2002      
                                                                         
     How about a runner who goes to work and on her break runs a 5-mile road race and wins it? I don't think a story like this ever appeared in Runner's World, but it happened in North Conway on Sunday, May 19 at the 5th Annual Get A Running Start 5-Mile Road Race. And, Mary Meehan-Bates made it happen when she took first place for the runners with a time of 34:08. Other top ten runners included: 2. Andrea Masters, 36:19; 3. Nicole Marcoe, 36:22; 4. Laura Mullin, 36:38; 5. Alycia Cavadi, 37:03; 6. Diane Betz, 37:27; 7. Andrea Patterson, 37:30; 8. Ellie Ferguson, 37:32; 9. Linda Waitkun, 37:36; 10. Virginia Howe, 37:45. Age group winners included: Jenna Serino, 14 & under, 49:15; Sarah Ziherl, 15-19, 39:59; Nicole Marcoe, 20-29; Laura Mullin, 40-49; Sally McMurdo, 50-59, 38:36; Maggie Solomon, 60-69, 46:03. A special congratulations goes out to the following runners who placed first among those who had never raced before: Kelley Acibhinn, 14 & under, 67:07; Jill Enus, 20-29, 46:08; Traci McCarthy, 30-39, 44:11; Pam Gregory, 40-49, 39:23; Lynn Harrison, 50-59, 49:56. In all, 102 runners ran the race this year. 

     Barb Renda of Albany placed first among a total of 68 walkers. Barb crossed the finish line with a time of 54:07. Other top ten finishers included: 2. Jean McKenna, 54:45; 3. Karen Stancik, 55:42; 4. Rosemary Good, 59:29; 5. Jean Serino, 60:17; 6. Paula Knight, 60:33; 7. Gretchen Loeffler, 60:34; 8. Louise Knox, 61:52; 9. Jeanne Dorman, 61:56; 10. Ann Glynn, 62:18. Eight walkers competed for Pine Tree School and 15 walkers for The Memorial Hospital.            

     Don't forget that the 24th Annual Jackson Covered Bridge Footrace and Kid's K gets underway on Saturday, June 1. The race starts at 10:00 a.m. sharp for runners and  9:30 a.m. for walkers. The race-day entry is $20. Walkers and runners alike are invited to participate and may register on the day of the race beginning at 8:00 until 9:30 a.m. at the Jackson Fire Station. For more information, contact race directors Victoria and Bruce Hill at: (603) 383-6400 or e-mail at: jackson10K@adelphia.net

     A Kids K will be held in conjunction with the Jackson Covered Bridge Race. Kids of all abilities, ages 12 and under can enter. The one kilometer race (about a half mile) will be held in the park at 12 noon. A shorter race for those with shorter legs will also be held. Everyone wins and there will be prizes and food for all. It is free, but an adult must be present to sign the entry form.

     As you probably know by now, the Fryeburg Academy Girls Track Team captured the Maine State Championship. To do so requires a team effort and each and every member of the girls' team should be congratulated. However, the performance of one runner truly stands out from the rest, and that was Mary Rhoads. Slowly but surely, Mary has come into her own as a runner for Coach Bill Reilly's Raiders both as a cross country runner and track runner. She's one of several Fryeburg runners that has taken part in all of the White Mountain Miler Track Meets in August. I'm sure everyone at Fryeburg is very proud of the team and especially Mary's performance in the 800m race. No one is prouder than her coach, Bill Reilly. Here is what Coach Reilly had to say about her amazing performance in his own words: "Mary Rhoads quadrupled in distance at the Western Maine Championships. She had the fastest leg, 2:27, on the winning 4x800 team, first in the 3200 in 11:49, first in the mile in 5:31, and first in the 800, 2:31. If that was not enough, let me describe her final race of the day, the 800. She was pretty tired and started out with Joanna and Mariah who were tired also. Four other girls shot out in front, probably told by their coaches that Mary was pooped for this day. Now the legend begins, witnessed by many and not exaggerated. Mary was at the 500 meter mark while the lead runner was just starting the turn at the 580 meter mark with three other runners behind her. With a burst of speed and heart, Mary took off temporarily disappearing behind the bleachers on the far side and reappearing 40 meters behind the leader and gaining rapidly. On the turn, she passed the #4-girl, then the #3-girl, then the #2-girl and just before the final straight the leader. She went on to win by 20 meters. She had made up 100 meters in the last 300 meters. I had her timed at 80 seconds for first 400 and at 71 seconds for the final 400 meters which she didn't start to accelerate in until the 100 meter point. The crowd fell into stunned silence at a truly remarkable performance." Congratulations to Mary Rhoads, the entire girls' team, and Coach Bill Reilly. That race will never be forgotten. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.

 

May 24, 2002      
                                                                         
           The 24th Annual Jackson Covered Bridge Footrace and Kid's K will be held on Saturday, June 1. The race starts at 10:00 a.m. sharp for runners and  9:30 a.m. for walkers. It is sponsored by the White Mountain Milers with the Jackson PTO. The race-day entry is $20. The proceeds of the race will benefit the Jackson Grammar School Athletic Program. The race was named as "one of New England's top 100 road races" by New England Runner in 1999 and 2000. 

     The challenging 10K (6.2 mile) course begins at the Jackson Covered Bridge, passes through town and follows the scenic "Five Mile Circuit" road passing farms, inns, Jackson Falls and the white church crossing the stone bridge and ending at the ball field.

     Timing will be provided by Granite State Race Services.  Awards include a $100 cash prize to both the overall fastest male and female along with $50 cash prize to the second place male and female finishers. Ten Age group categories are also included for runners and walkers. The first 125 entrants will receive a top quality four-color T-shirt. A picnic and raffle will follow the race. Walkers and runners alike are invited to participate and may register on the day of the race beginning at 8:00 until 9:30 a.m. at the Jackson Fire Station. For more information, contact race directors Victoria and Bruce Hill at: (603) 383-6400 or e-mail at: jackson10K@adelphia.net

     If you like to run, enjoy meeting other kids who like exercising, then the Kids K is the event for you. On Saturday, June 1, in conjunction with the Jackson Covered Bridge Race, come and enter a run for kids of all abilities, ages 12 and under. The one kilometer race (about a half mile) will be held in the park at 12 noon. A shorter race for those with shorter legs will also be held. Everyone wins and there will be prizes and food for all. It is free, but an adult must be present to sign the entry form.

     Mary Meehan-Bates captured first place for the runners and Barb Renda was first for the walkers at the 5th Annual Get A Running Start Road Race. The race was a great success. A record field walked and ran  on Sunday, May 19. Many of them were first time participants. Kudos to Marianne Jackson and all the volunteers that made this race possible. I will have the results for you next week.

     Congratulations to Alexandra Hill who broke the University of Vermont's steeplechase record for the second time this spring. Congratulations also to John Chandler who placed in his age group and earned points for his team at the first New Hampshire Grand Prix race of the season at the Bedford Rotary 12K on Saturday, May 18. John races for the Granite State Race Team coached by Bob Teschek.    

For the Fun of It. Weekly fun runs are held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. The course winds for 3.1 miles on soft trails through the woods. Walkers and runners of all abilities are invited to meet at the John Fuller School in North Conway. Here's your chance to meet people from all walks of life and abilities who are bound by their common interest in fitness. Weekly fun runs continue throughout the season until the end of October. Thank you to Maggie Solomon for hosting the runs during the month of May.


On the Track. Speed workouts are held every Thursday at 5:00 p.m. on the grass oval behind Kennett High School. Workouts can range from 400m repeats with a three minute rest interval between repeats to 800m repeats and longer rest intervals. Everyone runs at their own 400m pace but with the incentive of trying to stay with the runner just ahead of you. Anyone (especially newcomers) interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. No experience is necessary. If you have any questions or want more information about the speedwork, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.

 

May 17, 2002      
                                                                         
      The 5th Annual Get A Running Start Road Race takes place on Sunday, May 19. This certified five-mile race begins at the Intervale Motel in Intervale. It is an all women's race spotlighting the participation of new runners and first-time racers. It includes divisions for walkers and runners. Women of all ages and abilities are welcomed and encouraged to participate.
 

     The course is a "fast, mildly rolling loop beginning and ending at the intersection of Route 16 and the Intervale Crossroads across from the Scenic Vista." Specially colored T-shirts will be given to all  first-time runners. T-shirts will also be given to the first 100 registered veteran runners.
 

     Registration will be held on the lawn of the Intervale Motel from 7:30 to 9:15 a.m. The race gets underway at 9:00 a.m. for walkers and 9:30 a.m for runners. The entry fee is $18 on the day of the race. A post-race brunch will be provided. Sponsors include The Memorial Hospital, Ortho, Intervale Motel, and Sportshoe Center. Don't miss this White Mountain Miler 5-mile race, and if you can't run, consider giving race director Marianne Jackson and her crew a hand on race-day.
 

     Jean McKenna captured first place for the walkers at the 6th Annual Dalton Mountain Mud Run on Saturday, April 27. Jean cruised to first place with a time of 58:21 over the 5-mile course. Sunny and breezy conditions and another year with the absence of mud made things routine. Other Milers competing in running race included: 12. Spenser McKenna, 1st in age, 44:11; 20. Ed Martin, 1st in age, 55:15; 22. Jim Berry, 1st in age, 1:08:45.   
For the Fun of It. Weekly fun runs are held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. The course winds for 3.1 miles on soft trails through the woods. Walkers and runners of all abilities are invited to meet at the John Fuller School in North Conway. Here's your chance to meet people from all walks of life and abilities who are bound by their common interest in fitness. Weekly fun runs continue throughout the season until the end of October. Thank you to Maggie Solomon for hosting the runs during the month of May.

     The outdoor track season is winding down for freshman Kevin Tilton and the UNH Wildcats. Kevin had this to report:  "I got to run the 10K at the conference meet. I even led the first couple of laps. I didn't go out too fast. We ran 80 seconds for the first 400m. I ended up running 33:12 into a strong gale force hurricane head wind for 10th place. The winning time was around 31:50. The wind affected everyone. My coach wants me to take two full weeks off now, and I'm going to take advantage of it. I really don't feel badly though, but I probably need the rest. I'm definitely running Washington, but I'm not sure about Jackson. I'll see how I feel when I start running again." Congratulations to you Kevin.
 

On the Track. Speed workouts are held every Thursday at 5:00 p.m. on the grass oval behind Kennett High School. Workouts can range from 400m repeats with a three minute rest interval between repeats to 800m repeats and longer rest intervals. Everyone runs at their own 400m pace but with the incentive of trying to stay with the runner just ahead of you. Anyone (especially newcomers) interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. No experience is necessary. If you have any questions or want more information about the speedwork, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626.
 

     As races become more numerous in the upcoming weeks, I'll do my best to report the results of all our local runners. If you participate in a race, give me a call with the results at 284-6903, e-mail me at:  ajviens@lr.net, or send them by snail mail to 60 Trask Hill Rd., North Sandwich, NH 03259. Thanks for your help. Stay tuned for complete results next time for the Spring into Spring 5K, Big Lake Half Marathon, and Get A Running Start. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.

 

May 3, 2002
                                                                         
 
         Winter-like conditions with snow falling and temperatures in the 30s greeted the 68 runners and 22 walkers at the 2nd Annual Spring Into Spring 5K Race on Sunday, April 28, at the Pine Tree School in Center Conway. Lynn Talbot and Tim Livingston took first in their respective divisions of the running portion. Lynn completed the flat and fast course in 21:57, placing her 12th overall. Andrea Masters finished second, 14th overall, with a time of 22:19. In third place for the women was Virginia Howe in a time of 22:25. Livingston made this his second win in a row at this race and set a new course record with a time of 16:31. With no one challenging him for the lead, Tim was running against the clock with the hope of the record. Brendan Sullivan finished in second place with a time of 18:11. Fifty-four year old Bill Reilly of Brownfield, Maine, took third place overall and first in his age group with a time of 18:30. Bill can't wait to turn 55 in July, just in time for Beach to Beacon and a new age group. Other age group winners included (note: number in parenthesis is the place overall): male 5-9: Dan Garner, 27:55 (41st); female 5-9: Stephanie Loynd, 34:51 (63rd); female 10-14: 1. Kristen Hollum, 24:47 (24th); 2. Meaghan Murphy, 25:09 (28th); 3. Jess Murphy, 32:20 (57th); male 15-19: Josh Fawson, 19:24 (4th); female 15-19: Erin Murphy, 26:13 (34th); female 20-24: Katie Epstein, 29:06 (47th); male 30-34: 1. Joe LaRue, 25:04 (27th); 2. Chuck Rawlings, 25:36 (29th); 3. Charlie Fallon, 29:21 (50th); female 30-34: 1. Stepahnie Krebs, 24:35, (23rd); 2. Christine Rothwangl, 27:25, (38th); 3. Susan Morgan, 27:26 (39th); male 35-39: 1. Brendan Sullivan; 2. John Krebs, 19:54, (5th); 3. Pat Murphy, 21:49, (9th); female 35-39: 1. Andrea Masters; 2. Tammi Mallet, 22:47 (16th); 3. Brenda Murphy, 28:06 (43rd); male 40-44, Curtis Cote, 20:18 (7th); female 40-44: 1. Lynn Talbot; 2. Jane Chauvin, 24:17 (29th); 3. Toni Howard, 25:57 (32nd); male 45-49: 1. AJ Viens, 19:55 (6th); 2. Sandy Sanborn, 21:35 (8th); 3. Kevin Callahan, 21:54 (10th); female 45-49: 1. Virginal Howe; 2. Val Jackson, 24:54 (25th) 3. Carol Viens, 25:45 (30th); male 50-54: 1. Bill Reilly; 2. Joe Fay, 21:55 (11th); 3. Bill Crowley, 22:08 (13th); female 50-54: 1. Judy Reilly, 24:31 (22nd); 2. Dee Yeager, 26:40 (35th); 3. Cathy Kyle, 29:42 (52nd); male 55-59: 1. Gary Howard, 22:11 (19th); 2. Bill Rodgers, 22:12; 3. Frank Shorter, 22:13; female 55-59: 1. Sally Swenson, 24:01 (17th); 2. Nancy Miller, 27:14 (36th); 3. Linda Eldridge, 30:53 (55th); male 65-69: 1. Sumner Rupprecht, 25:51 (31st); 2. Ed Astrachan, 35:14 (64th); female 65-69: 1. Rita Debonis, 32:33 (60th); male 75-79: 1. John Judge Chandler, 27:24 (37th); 2. Jim Berry, 38:22 (66th).      
 

April 26, 2002

     David Freedman easily captured first place in the walking division with a time of 28:31. Barb Schamadan, after coming off a win at Ammonoosuc several weeks ago, didn't hold anything back and walked her way to another first place finish. Barb edged out last year's winner by just three seconds. Schamadan finished with a time of 33:05 followed by Karen Stancik in 33:08. Long-time running guru Maggie Solomon traded her running shoes for walking shoes and finished third with a time of 37:00.    Other age group winners for the walkers included: male and female 5-9: 1. Thomas Loynd, 43:09; 1. Alexandra Prittie, 1:08:43; female 30-34: 1. Julie Shuster, 43;00; male and female 35-39: 1. Kevin Clements, 41:22; 1. Judy Clements, 41;21; 2. Jo Williams, 43:43; male and female 45-49: 1. Jack Loynd, 43:08; 1. Barb Schamadan; 2. Karen Stancik; 3. Marcia Ultz, 40:02; female 50-54: 1. Candy Armstrong, 40:56; 2. Carol Sargent, 44:16; 3. Jean Potter Murphy, 44:40; male and female 55-59: 1. Don Bean, 40:57; 2. Rick Knight, 41:24; 1. Paula Knight, 41:23; 2. Laura Jawitz, 44:22; female 60-64: 1. Dorothy Schiessl, 44:25; Shirley Haugh, 1:09:46; female 65-69: 1. Maggie Solomon; male 75-79: 1. Bob Fisher, 1:09:47.  Congratulation to all the walkers and runners. Kudos to race director Steve Dowling and his volunteers for putting on one fine race. Thank you to the folks at Fandangles who provided all the food and its preparation free of charge. All the runners and walkers were most appreciative.

     For the Fun of It. The first fun run of the season takes place on Tuesday, May 7. Weekly fun runs are held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. The course winds for 3.1 miles on soft trails through the woods. Walkers and runners of all abilities are invited to meet at the John Fuller School in North Conway. Here's your chance to meet people from all walks of life and abilities who are bound by their common interest in fitness. Weekly fun runs continue throughout the season until the end of October. The conditions should be excellent for the first run; however, don't put your winter running clothes away just yet.

     Thoughts on the Run. Congratulations to Cathy Kyle who placed in her age group on Sunday for the very first time. She was one proud lady. Hats off to our youngest walkers for the day, Thomas Loynd and Alexandra Prittie and our youngest runners, Dan the Man Garner and Stephanie Loynd. Think about this for a moment. John Chandler, at age 75, ran faster than almost half of the field. As Jim Berry was driving to the race and saw that snow was falling, he did consider packing it in and heading to Wildcat for one more run. Gary Howard never runs 5Ks, but he did on Sunday. Kevin Callahan does run 5Ks. Gary Howard was only 17 seconds behind Callahan. At his pre-race press conference, Kevin had this to say: "I'd really be happy with a 17:59 today." Some things will never come true. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.


April 19, 2002      
                                                                         
     Cloudy but warm temperatures greeted a record crowd at the 9th Annual Ammonoosuc Amble 5-Miler on Saturday, April 13, in Bethlehem, NH. And, for the first time ever in White Mountain Miler history, a husband and wife team took first place in a race. John and Barb Renda of Albany, NH, bested a field of 103 walkers and captured first place in their respective divisions. John race-walked the course in a time of 53:12 at a pace of 10:39/mile. Not far behind John was Larry Garland who finished third overall with a time of 54:25. Barb Renda was the first woman and finished with a time of 56:10 placing her fifth overall in the field. Jean McKenna ended up sixth overall in 56:30 and first in her age group. Other Milers included: 7. Karen Stancik, 57:45, 2nd in age; 18. Dorothy Nepshinsky, 1:06:20, first in age; and AJ Nepshinsky, 1:11:55, first in age. The Miler race-walkers are certainly a group to watch with five age group winners.    

Although I don't think he is a Miler any longer, Josh Kendrick and his wife drove out all the way from Missoula, Montana, to test themselves on the Amble course. The twenty-nine year-old Montanan placed 16th overall and first in his age group with a time of 33:29. His wife Kim finished 103rd with a time of 53:13. Josh's brother, Tory, ran a race on the same day back in Missoula. Tory is getting married on Saturday, April 20, after he finishes his leg in the Friends of Tuckerman Ravine Tuckerman Inferno Pentathlon. Congratulations Tory!

     After nearly two-and-a-half years away from racing, Miler Barbara Robinson made her return to the scene at the Amble. Barbara captured first place in her age group with a time of 42:51 and 62nd place overall. Barbara is currently training for the Mount Washington Road Race.

     One hundred fifteen runners competed and among them were: 22. AJ Viens, 34:01; 24. Steve Whitney, 35:21, first in age; 26. Curtis Cote, 35:55; 30. Laura Mullin, 37:15, first in age; 31. Tony Mullin, 37:15; 32. Andrea Masters, 37:18, first in age; 45. Bill Crowley, 39:10; 48. Kevin Callahan, 39:47; 59. Gary Howard, 42:19; 70. Carol Viens, 43:59; 95. Pat Fry, 52:07; 99. Lucille Russo, 52:46; 100. Cathy Kyle, 52:48; 101. Jean Brauel, 52:49; Jim Berry, 1:12:34. Congratulations to all these walkers and runners. Kudos to Ed Martin for directing the race. He apologizes to one and all for the glitch that occurred with the results. Although they were not ready for the awards, Ed and his crew had them up and posted on Coolrunning by early afternoon.      

On the Track. Speed workouts are held every Thursday at 5:00 p.m. on the grass oval behind Kennett High School. Workouts can range from 400m repeats with a three minute rest interval between repeats to 800m repeats and longer rest intervals. Everyone runs at their own 400m pace but with the incentive of trying to stay with the runner just ahead of you. Anyone (especially newcomers) interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. No experience is necessary. If you have any questions or want more information about the speedwork, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626.

     On Sunday, April 7, Bill Reilly of Brownfield, ran the Presidential 5-Miler in Kennebunkport  Billy placed first in the 50-59 age group with a time of 29:43. This earned him a place of 27th overall out of a field of 254 runners. Bill had this to say: "Things are looking up. I ran this race in 30:41 when I first entered the 50-59 in 1998. Hopefully, I can keep this up when I enter the 55-59 age group this summer. I really do think I can run 28:30 as a 60 year old." I think he can too. Good luck to all the Milers competing in the Tuckerman Inferno Pentathlon on Saturday. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.

 

 April 12, 2002

The 9th Annual Ammonoosuc Amble 5 Miler gets underway on Saturday, April 13, in Bethlehem, NH. The Ammonoosuc Community Health Services is sponsoring the race. Slated as a five mile event for walkers and runners, the course ambles over a closed loop with all but 1/4 mile of the race on paved roads. Splits will be given at each mile. One water stop will be available.


     Registration begins at 9:00 a.m at Profile High School. Start time for walkers is 10:00 a.m.(this is a change from last year) and 11:00 a.m. for runners. The entry fee is  $12. A post-race food feast and raffle will follow the event. Changing and shower facilities are available at Profile High School. Race director Ed Martin says that the timing will be provided by Local Yokels Timing for this USA Track & Field sanctioned event on this USA Track & Field certified course. For more information call 444-2464, ex. 27, e-mail: egmnh@together.net.    

     Thank you to Pat Fry and Gary Howard for hosting all the breakfast runs this season. Sunday marked the last Breakfast Run until next December. A special birthday cake was enjoyed by all in honor of John Chandler's 75th birthday that he and Martha celebrated on April 6. You can expect John to kick-off his season of racing at the Ammonoosuc Amble.  

     Many Milers begin the race season at the Ammonoosuc Amble 5 Mile Run/Walk. Race director Ed Martin reports that everything is set and ready to go. Barbara Robinson will be 68 on race-day, and Ed reports that, although he is not 100 percent sure, this may be her first race since she was injured in a ski crash on her home slope at Cannon Mountain over two years ago. As Ed stated in his e-mail to me: "It'll be nice to have Barbara back." We all wish her the best as she returns to racing.

     Ed also had news to relay about some North Country races: "The sad news is that two Nawth Country races probably will not happen this year. The Bethlehem Open for the Season 5K/10K appears not to have a backer, unless someone shows up pretty quickly (the race was to be in mid-June). There may be an organization willing to support it in 2003. The other race probably not going to be held this year is the venerable Franconia Scramble 10K.  Tim Cowles, co-director with his wife Kim, has been battling a major health problem for the past six months or so and just does not have the energy. I don't know the status of the Race to The Face Triathlon which the Cowles also co-direct. There is some chance that the Scramble will be back in 2003 but on a new course. So, will it still be the Scramble?"

          Kevin Tilton is busy training and racing outdoor track for the UNH Wildcats. At a recent meet at Dartmouth, Kevin set two PRs. First, he ran a 4:17 in the 1500m. Pleased with his new PR in the 1500m, Kevin called on all his reserves and sped to a 2:08 finish in the 800m. On Saturday, April 6, at his first home meet of the season on the new state-of-the-art UNH track, he posted a 16:04 for the 5K despite a swift and steady headwind. Kevin attributes his success partly to the mountain runs with Marc Chauvin and Tim Livingston. Kevin said, "What the heck, they almost killed me on those runs; I knew a race on the track could not be so bad." I hope the Bob Kennedys helped.

     Freshman Alexandra Hill of the University of Vermont set a new school record for the 3000m steeplechase. Alexandra placed third overall and finished with a time of 12:11:56. Her proud dad, scientist Bruce Hill of Jackson, is moonlighting for the Catamounts as a sports photographer. You can checkout Alexandra in action in a photo taken by Bruce at the UVM Web site: www.uvm.edu/athletics/outdoor_track. Congratulations to both Kevin and Alexandra. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.


 April 5, 2002      
                                                                         
    
     The last Breakfast Run of the season takes place on Sunday, April 7, and it promises to be a very special one. Invitations have gone out to all new members and for anyone else wishing to learn more about running and who the White Mountain Milers are. This runs for you according to host Gary Howard. All you need to do is come and enjoy the camaraderie, the cheer, and all the delicious breakfast items that the regulars of the Breakfast Run will provide for you. It all begins at 9:00 a.m. from the Last Resort Inn of Pat Fry and Gary Howard. Regular attendees should bring their usual mix of breakfast fare. Various routes can be run or walked depending on your mood for the morning. A simple out and back of 1, 2, or 3 miles is possible. The Bald Hill loop is the standard one, averaging around 6.2 miles for those hearty souls. It starts in front of the Albany Breakfast Clubhouse and heads out to the Darby Field Inn. From Darby Field, the run heads for the Kanc and a scenic tour along the Swift River as we turn east and back to Conway and Route 16. The first five miles are mostly flat with just a few short downhills. Give Gary or Pat a call at 447-1974 if you have never attended a Breakfast Run before and plan to attend on Sunday. They can answer any questions you might have. 

     Gary Howard would like to remind all his volunteers that are helping out with the running portion of the Pentathlon about the meeting at Black Mountain. You are invited to the free pasta feed at Black on Thursday, April 18. This is the final meeting before the race-day on Saturday, April 20. That evening, you will receive your race goody bag and T-shirt. Anyone helping Gary on race-day is asked to come to the Breakfast Run at his house in Albany on Sunday, April 7. Gary would like to review your responsibility and all the benefits you'll receive volunteering for the race. Volunteers are still needed. Give Gary a call for more information.

     Two hundred twenty-four runners turned out for the 4th Annual Gilmanton 5K Road Race on Saturday, March 30. Milers Tim Livingston and Carol Viens brought home the honors for the club. Tim captured third place in his age group with a time of 18:01, bettering his time by nearly 15 seconds from last year and placing eighth overall. Livingston had this to say, "I am pleased with my time compared to last year, but 17:59 would have looked even better." Carol also placed third in her age group out of 15 runners with a time of 28:08 and 95th place overall. This was Carol's first race in Gilmanton and she said, "I did better on that 1200m hill than I thought I would." Other local finishers included: 31. AJ Viens, 21:06; 68. Emily Briggs, 25:38; 69. Philip Ramunno, 25:41; 124. David Nagel, 30:38; 128. Sarah Ramunno, 31:20; 131. Margie Ramunno, 31:23; 132. Mary Nagel, 31:23. Congratulations to all these runners.             

     Donna Cormier ran a 3:12 at the Eastern States 20 Miler last weekend. Around mile-11, in the seaside town of Rye, Gentleman Jim Berry was on the sideline, providing cheer and encouragement to all runners.  Donna would like to thank Jim for the encouragement he gave her. Donna also sent this message my way: "I am currently at $5,000 in donations for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Dana-Farber Marathon Challenge. My sister MJ Britton and my mother Dorothy Cormier are cancer survivors, and  now my other sister, Patti Capone, has been diagnosed and is undergoing radiation treatments. My Boston Marathon 26.2 mile run has a finish line of a world without cancer. Donations may be sent to Donna Cormier, RR1 Box 109, Fryeburg, ME 04037. Please allow me to run in honor or in memory of someone who has faced this horrible disease."

     This year marks the first time ever that my wife and I both got into the Mount Washington Road Race. By now, you've probably received an e-mail from Bob Teschek informing you of your fate. If you are one of the unlucky ones who did not get in, remember, you still have a chance to earn a spot in the race if you are a White Mountain Miler. Bring your rejection letter to the Miler Annual Meeting on April 23. The club has 15 entries for the race. It will cost you more than a regular entry. Here are the requirements: 1. Entries are first made available to any current or former club officers who have been rejected in the lottery this year. 2. Next, if entries still remain (and they always do) they go to club members in good standing (have you paid your dues?) and have volunteered in a Miler in the past year. . Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.

 

March 29, 2002      
                                                                         
    
     The spring race season gets underway for some of our local runners this weekend. The 4th Annual Gilmanton 5K Road Race takes place on Saturday, March 30. The race-day entry fee is $12. Registration is from 8:00 to 9:45 a.m. at the Sant Bani School in Gilmanton. The race is being run in memory of Warren Nighswander. Warren maintained a law practice with the Sulloway and Hollis firm in Concord with much of his work done on a pro bono basis for the less fortunate. He died following a jog with fellow lawyers at the YMCA in Concord on May 11, 1998. Start time is 10:00 a.m. sharp. The course starts in the center of town at the Gilmanton Academy. It runs downhill for the most part for the first 1.5 miles. The race begins in earnest as you take a right onto Currier Hill Road and climbs for 1200 meters. For most of this climb you are running on dirt. Last year's conditions were muddy and slow. Nearing the crest of the hill, the surface changes from dirt to hardtop. After the hill, there's a drop in elevation as you make your push to the finish in the last 200 meters. For more information contact Scott Clark at: (603) 267-7083, e-mail: sjclark@fcgnetworks.net.
     Last year's group of Milers had a strong showing at the race. Expect the likes of Jim Berry, John Chandler, Tim Livingston, and Kevin Callahan to wear the Miler colors in this first race of the season.
     It won't be too long before many Milers travel north for the 9th Annual Ammonoosuc Amble 5 Mile Run/Walk on Saturday, April 13. Race director Ed Martin reports that everything is set and ready to go. Barbara Robinson will be 68 on race-day, and Ed reports that, although he is not 100 percent sure, this may be her first race since she was injured in a ski crash on her home slope at Cannon Mountain over two years ago. As Ed stated in his e-mail to me: "It'll be nice to have Barbara back." We all wish her the best as she returns to racing.
     Ed also had news to relay about some North Country races: "The sad news is that two Nawth Country races probably will not happen this year. The Bethlehem Open for the Season 5K/10K appears not to have a backer, unless someone shows up pretty quickly (the race was to be in mid-June). There may be an organization willing to support it in 2003. The other race probably not going to be held this year is the venerable Franconia Scramble 10K.  Tim Cowles, co-director with his wife Kim, has been battling a major health problem for the past six months or so and just does not have the energy. I don't know the status of the Race to The Face Triathlon which the Cowles also co-direct. There is some chance that the Scramble will be back in 2003 but on a new course. So, will it still be the Scramble?"   
On the Track. Bernie Livingston reports that speed workouts are now being held at Cranmore Shores every Thursday at 5:15 p.m. Workouts can range from 400m repeats with a three minute rest interval between repeats to 800m repeats and longer rest intervals. Everyone runs at their own 400m pace but with the incentive of trying to stay with the runner just ahead of you. Anyone (especially newcomers) interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. No experience is necessary. If you have any questions or want more information about the speedwork, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626.         
     This year marks the first time ever that my wife and I both got into the Mount Washington Road Race. By now, you've probably received an e-mail from Bob Teschek informing you of your fate. If you are one of the unlucky ones who did not get in, remember, you still have a chance to earn a spot in the race if you are a White Mountain Miler. Bring your rejection letter to the Miler Annual Meeting on April 23. The club has 15 entries for the race. It will cost you more than a regular entry. Here are the requirements: 1. Entries are first made available to any current or former club officers who have been rejected in the lottery this year. 2. Next, if entries still remain (and they always do) they go to club members in good standing (have you paid your dues?) and have volunteered in a Miler in the past year. The last Breakfast Run of the season is coming up on April 7. I'll have more about this special run that is being dedicated to new club members for you next time. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.
 


March 22, 2002      
                                                                         
     How far would you travel for a race? How about St. John, Virgin Islands? That's exactly what Billy Reilly and his wife Judy did recently to run the 8 Tuff Miles 2002 on the island. Bill had this to say: "Actually the race is closer to 8.3 miles and starts at the ball field in Cruz Bay and finishes at the ball field in Coral Bay. [Sounds like Falmouth but with a long plane ride.] The course begins with an elevation gain of about 800 ft. for the first 1.5 miles. Then the course 'rolls' for 4 miles with a gain of about 700 ft. discounting some steep downhills. At 5.5, it descends 1000 ft. to sea level at Coral Bay. After the race there is a big gathering at local watering hole in Coral Bay known as Skinny Legs and famous for their 'same day service'. This race was a blast and I recommend it all." There were 350 finishers. Judy won her age group with a time of 1:31:08. And Bill, who enters a new age group this July, took first place honors in his age group with a time of 1:00:21 and fifth place overall.
     What would you expect an Irishman to do on St. Paddy's Day? Eat corned beef and cabbage? I hear they don't really do that in Ireland. No, if you're a runner and you're Irish, you do what any real runner in Ireland does, run a road race. Billy Green Shorts Reilly donned his best Irish outfit, got into his car, set his GPS for Saco, Maine, and hit the cruise control, not quite the luxury of a flight to the Caribbean, but hey, a real Irish runner would rather get muddy running cross country. Billy smoked the field of 350 and finished 15th overall in 23:17 at the Kerryman 4-Miler on Sunday. This also marked the third race this year that the Brownfield Bomber captured first in his age group. Judy, who seems to be bitten by the racing bug this year, finished 206th overall and fifth in her age group with a time of 33:30. It was her idea to drag Bill off to the Virgin Islands to just do a road race. What was she thinking? Will Rotterdam, Fukuoka, or some other exotic race be next?
     Race director Bruce Hill says things are underway for the 24th Annual Jackson Covered Bridge 10K set for Saturday, June 1. If you want a copy of the race entry let him know and he will send a pdf. copy to you, or you can go to www.whitemountainmilers.com to download one. You can also sign up online; go to coolrunning.com. Online entries are already coming in. Bruce is also in need of help for the race. If you can spare some time, please join him. They will only have a couple of meetings. The next scheduled meeting is on Thursday, April 4, at 6:30 p.m. at the Hill house in Jackson.  Pizza will be served.  Please let him know if you can come and pass the word.  They need people to make this race happen. For more information about the meeting or directions to Bruce's home, give him a call at: 383-6400 or e-mail him at: bruce@clnatf.org.
On the Track. Bernie Livingston reports that speed workouts are now being held at Cranmore Shores every Thursday at 5:15 p.m. Workouts can range from 400m repeats with a three minute rest interval between repeats to 800m repeats and longer rest intervals. Everyone runs at their own 400m pace but with the incentive of trying to stay with the runner just ahead of you. Anyone (especially newcomers) interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. No experience is necessary. If you have any questions or want more information about the speedwork, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626.         
     Finally, don't forget about the 4th Annual Gilamanton 5K coming up next week on Saturday, March 30. You can sign-up on race day. I'll have all the details about it for you next week. "When I was a kid, people would ask if I wanted to be the next Ronny Delany of Ireland, and I said, 'No, I don't want to be Ronny Delany, I want to be the next Eamonn Coghlan of Ireland.'" -Eamonn Coghlan, Olympic competitor, former world record holder for an indoor mile, and first master ever to run a sub-4 minute mile. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.
 



March 8, 2002      
                                                                         
     The fourth Albany Breakfast Run of the season took place on schedule despite the predictions of a spring rain storm. To all those people who called to see if the run would be on, you should have known by now that the man who fords the Saco River in January on a run, runs to the top of Black Cap in a thunderstorm that makes the fireworks display over the Wasatch Mountains from this year's Olympics look like child's play, and doesn't hesitate a step crossing a beaver bog while the water level keeps rising past waist-level, this man, Gary Mountain Man Howard, would not even entertain the notion of canceling a breakfast run for a little rain. Yes, the run was on, the rain never was a factor. And, the food was the best ever. In fact, Kevin Callahan made his world-famous egg dish on the spot with cilantro, freshly picked that morning by the gardening guru of Albany, Pat Fry. It was a great day for a run. Steve Moose Dowling kept his string of running days in a row intact by completing number 62. He didn't even hesitate at the bottom of the hill. Moose lowered his head, gritted his teeth, and charged that monster like Teddy Roosevelt and the Rough Riders. The leader of the Bull Moose Party would have been proud. The Mountain Man ran the hill pain-free for the first time since last July. He attributes this new found feeling to the Yogi Bear yoga techniques he has been performing. Bill Crowley and Kevin Callahan were part of the charge too. Mark your calendar for the final breakfast run of the season slated for Sunday, April 7. Gary promises to have the outdoor shower turned on. Also, a special invitation is being sent out to all new members of the club inviting them to the final breakfast of the season. The theme: this run's for you. As always, thank you to Pat, Gary, Daisy Dog, and Asics for hosting Sunday's run.

     The Tilney family of Jackson packed their bags with their running gear and headed down to Cape Cod to test the waters in the Hyannis Half Marathon and 10K on Sunday, February 24. And the trip was worth taking. Kirsten Tilney finished the day on the 13.1 mile course in a time of 1:42:31 for a 7:50/mile pace, placing 265th out of 1,091 runners. Heather came across in 780th place with a time of 2:03:24. The matriarch of the family, Lorraine, also had a good showing. Congratulations to you all. 

  
     I had no difficulty registering for the Mount Washington Road Race online. The directions are simple enough and the system seemed to be working fine. One hundred more runners are being accepted for this year's field. This probably has something to do with the fact that their are many no-shows each year. It seems that races that have a cut-off number always have to contend with this problem, especially if the entry is due months in advance of race-day. Injuries, illness, and unexpected emergencies do arise. But please, carefully consider whether you are really going to commit to train for an event. I suspect there are some runners who get caught up in the hype of entering but with no real plan to train for it. By the time race-day rolls around, that runner had already decided several weeks before not to run because they just hadn't trained enough. But someone who didn't make the lottery or the cut and is trained doesn't have the opportunity to compete. We all know it happens more than it should. With that said, you still have until March 15, to sign-up in the lottery for Mount Washington. Log-on to Bob Teschek's Web site at: www.gsrs.com.

 
     Here's the latest from Owen Anderson, an exercise physiologist and former columnist for Runner's World magazine, about high intensity versus high mileage training. Anderson writes Running Research News, a newsletter billed by him as "the only running newsletter written entirely by exercise physiologists." In the September 2001 issue, he cites a study done on cross country skiers that compares high-volume training, a tradition in the world of elite skiers, versus high-intensity training. World-class skiers (like Thomas Alsgard of Norway) and other endurance athletes (runners) continue to rack up the hours (skiers) and hours (runners) over intensity. Although not much research has been done regarding high-volume versus high intensity training, Anderson points to research."carried out at the University of Montana, University of Minnesota, and St. Cloud State University with top-quality American cross-country skiers, athletes who dramatically increased their quantity of high-quality training achieved impressive improvements in performance, compared to  the previous year of training and competition, while individuals who stepped up their volume of training in a traditional way failed to improve." Translation: low mileage together with high intensity training works for ordinary runners like us. More about Anderson's ideas in the weeks ahead. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.


 


March 1, 2002      

     As I sit here this Tuesday morning, composing this piece, I think, will this be the day? The weather prognosticators have promised the fifties and sunny skies. They have teased me with this since the weekend. There have been opportunities for this to date; I recall several mild Saturdays in the last two weeks where it might have been possible, but other things drew me away and by the time I had returned, the opportunity had passed me by. Today is going to be different. I can smell it in the air as I poke my head outside after getting up to see if today might be the day. In fact, I am so confident about today that I've  saved my long run for it.
This winter has been a disappointment for a true winter-lover. We've not had any significant storms. The weather has been very mild. So mild in fact, that John Harrigan, who writes an outdoor column for the New Hampshire Sunday News from his home near Colebrook, reports that he can recall only four days this winter that the morning temperature was below zero; that's unusual for someone living just a good spit from the 45th parallel.I still haven't used some of my cold-weather gear this year and probably won't.

Today, I am ready for spring running. I know these days will not be the norm during the next two months. Having gained a little over two hours of daylight since December 21, my late-day runs will no longer be in the dark. Most of my running will require tights and a top, albeit light ones; I'll still be running during a cool time of the day. Today brings hope. Fifty degrees, no wind, clear blue skies, a day for shorts, a chance to get back to the freedom of real running, unencumbered by the layers of winter. The calendar might read February 26, but today is the first day of spring running for me. Run fast, run wild, and don't look back.                                                                         

     The fourth Albany Breakfast Run of the season takes place on Sunday, March 1. It begins at 9:00 a.m. from the Last Resort Inn of Pat Fry and Gary Howard. Don't forget to bring a potluck dish. Various routes can be run depending on your mood for the morning. The Bald Hill loop is the standard one, averaging around 6.2 miles. It starts in front of the Albany Breakfast Clubhouse and heads out to the Darby Field Inn. From Darby Field, the run heads for the Kanc and a scenic tour along the Swift River as we turn east and back to Conway and Route 16. The first five miles are mostly flat with just a few short downhills. For more
information call 447-1974. Remember, don't forget to bring your recipes for first edition of the Albany Breakfast Run Cookbook. Is this what the club has come to?        

Mount Washington Road Race Information. Today's the day that you've all been waiting for since last June, your chance to throw your name into the lottery and be one of the 1000 runners who will compete in the 42nd Annual Mount Washington Road Race on Saturday, June 15. The phone lines are open and this is my last time telling you how to do it.   "Registration may be done either online, or by printing out an online form and mailing it in with your check. You do NOT need to send a Self Addressed Stamped Envelope for information - it will all be provided on the web site [www.gsrs.com]. The registration Web site will be available between 10:00 a.m. on March 1st and will remain open until March 15. The Mount Washington Road Race is not like most other races, and it is imperative that you read and understand many of the details BEFORE you attempt to sign up. That information is available on the race information page. Once you have read and understood all of this information you may click here to sign up for the 2002 race. This link will not be active until 10:00 a.m. on March 1, 2002." And, if after March 15, you are not one of the lucky ones, there is always the 15 entries that you can vie for from the White Mountain Milers at their annual meeting on April 23. Remember, you have to be a paid-up member that has volunteered in some capacity at a Miler event since the last annual meeting in 2001. Good luck to you all; the rock pile awaits.

     Last week, I said that I would share some very interesting information with you from Owen Anderson, an exercise physiologist and former columnist for Runner's World magazine about high intensity versus high mileage training, that one will have to wait for another week. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.

 

     "The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part, just as the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle."  -Baron de Coubertin, the founder of the modern Olympics. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.

January 25, 2002      
 
     Good luck to all the Milers that are running the 7th Annual Boston Prep 16 Miler sponsored by the Greater Derry Track Club on Sunday, January 27. Steve Bamsey and Tim Livingston are running as they both prepare for the Boston Marathon. Rick Copley is another possibility as he too is running Boston. Race-day registration is $20 and takes place at the West Running Brook Middle School in Derry, NH, from 8:30 to 9:45 a.m. The race starts at 10:00 a.m. 

      One hundred and twenty-nine runners are registered so far for the First Annual Big Lake Half Marathon in Alton, NH, on Saturday, May 4. A relay will also be held in conjunction with the individual race. "Teams of two or three may compete in the relay segment. The half marathon course will be divided into three legs. Teams consisting of all male, all female and mixed will be eligible for awards. Relay members will be stationed at two distinct relay points where they must receive their team's championchip and strap from their teammate and fasten it around their ankle before beginning their leg of the relay. The relay sections will be divided into the following: 4 miles, 4 miles, and 5.1 miles. You are responsible for getting to your starting position on the course." The entry fee for individuals is $25.00 and $40 for relay teams. A late fee of $5 will result for entries received after April 2, 2002. There is no race-day registration, and the field is limited to 1200 runners. Check the calendar in the for more information.

There is no news to report yet about the 42nd Annual Mount Washington Road Race on Saturday, June 15. According to the information on the Granite State Race Service Web site: "To register for the race lottery, checkout this page in February of 2002 for details. You do NOT need to send a self-addressed stamped envelope for information - it will all be provided on the Web site. Actual registration is slated to take place between March 1 and March 15." For more information, go to their Web site at: www.gsrs.com, or e-mail race director Bob Teschek at: racetime@gsrs.com.

    Congratulations to Maggie Solomon of Glen, who once again was recognized as one of New England Runner's runners of the year for 2001. Maggie has garnered many recognitions from this magazine over the years. This year she was recognized as the number two woman in the veteran women division for 65-69.

     Finally, don't forget about the Maine Track Club's 21st Annual Mid-Winter 10-Mile Classic in Cape Elizabeth, ME, on Sunday, February 3. See the calendar if you need any information right away. I'll have all latest information for you next week about this classic Maine event that New England Runner named as one of the top 100 races in 2001.

     "Running is my meditation, mind flush, cosmic telephone, mood elevator and spiritual communion. -Lorraine Moller, winner of the bronze medal in the marathon at Barcelona and the 1984 women's winner at the Boston Marathon. Until next week, 



  

  1/11/02

News is already circulating around the club about a number of Milers that plan on running the 106th Annual Boston Marathon on Monday, April 15. Needless to say, training is well underway for those souls who are serious about racing their best on marathon day. The 7th Annual Boston Prep 16 Miler sponsored by the Greater Derry Track Club on Sunday, January 27, is a perfect early season race to see just what your marathon pace is at this point in your training. The race was selected by New England Runner as one of the top 50 races in New England. Race-day registration is $20 and takes place at the West Running Brook Middle School in Derry, NH, from 8:30 to 9:45 a.m. If you preregister by January 18, it will only cost you $15. The race starts at 10:00 a.m. Race director Dave Breeden calls it a "moderately difficult wheel measured loop running through the back roads of Derry." Mile markers can be found at every mile with three water stops at mile 5, 9, and 12. The race is limited to 800 runners. Organizers warn you that no refunds will be given, and that "the race may be canceled without rescheduling due to inclement weather. Dave Dunham holds the course of 1:26:53 set in 1999, and Dana Parrot has the women's course record of 1:50:33 also set in 1999. As Bernie Livingston always said, race-pace training is one of the cornerstones for anyone training for a goal race like Boston. With a little over two months before marathon day, the Boston Prep 16 Miler is a perfect race-pace distance to test yourself with and it comes at a perfect time.

     Speaking about race-pace training, a half marathon is a perfect preparation race for anyone preparing to run Mount Washington in June. Many runners used the Covered Bridges Half Marathon in Woodstock, Vermont, just for that purpose. With the demise of the Covered Bridges race, the First Annual Big Lake Half Marathon in Alton, NH, that I wrote about last week, is a perfect replacement for anyone looking for a half before Mount Washington. It takes place on Saturday, May 4, plenty of time for recovery and refinement in your training before Mount Washington. I'll have all the news about registration for the 42nd Annual Mount Washington Road Race for you next week.

On the Track. Speed workouts are held every Thursday at 5:15 p.m. at Settlers Green. Meet behind the hotel at the far end of the parking lot near the Fairway Road. The hearty group of speed demons that show up each week have been running 800m repeats with a three minute rest interval between repeats. Everyone runs at their own 800m pace but with the incentive of trying to stay with the runner just ahead of you.  Anyone (especially newcomers) interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. No experience is necessary. If you have any questions about the relays or want more information about the speed work, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626.

     Thank you to Pat Fry and Gary Howard for hosting the second Albany Breakfast Run of the season on Sunday, January 6. It was not a record crowd but very close to it. Kudos to Bill Crowley who made his first-ever breakfast run and conquered Bald Hill Road to boot. It was nice to see Frank Holmes who made the trek north from Chocorua. Kevin Callahan continued to boast about his prowess over Bob Parrish. Bob, where are you when challenges are flying? Some might say that Kevin is vulnerable right now. 

Good luck to John Renda as he race walks his way through his second marathon, this time in Florida. John is becoming the premier race walker of the Milers.

"We are different, in essence, from other men. If you want to win something, run 100 meters. If you want to experience something, run a marathon." -Emil Zatopek, winner of four gold medals that included three golds in 1952 in the 5,000 meters, 10,000 meters, and the marathon. All three wins set an Olympic record.

January 4, 2002      
 
     There is a new half marathon coming to the Lakes Region that the race organizers say is sure "to become a legendary New England event on a beautiful, fast course together with great amenities, entertainment, and attention to detail that is second to none." The First Annual Big Lake Half Marathon takes place on Saturday, May 4, at 9:00 a.m. in Alton, NH, and is being sponsored by Summit Rehabilitation and Nutfield Spring Water.
     The point to point race starts at the Alton Central School. All parking will be at the race start with buses available to take athletes from the finish back to the Alton Central School following the race. The school has showers and lockers available for all athletes. The start is 2 miles from the finish line in Alton Bay. Number pick-up begins at 7:00 a.m. at the Alton Central School. There, you will be given your Champion Chip, bib number, and goodie bag. 
     The course is a "beautiful 13.1 mile scenic run along the shores of Lake Winnipesaukee and Alton Bay. Views of the White Mountains and the Ossipee range fill the background. The course has some gentle rollers and one significant hill at mile 8. The last 5 miles are a gentle downgrade." Lead and Sag vehicles will be provided by Lakes Region VW Audi. Mile markers will be found each mile along with 5K and 10K markers. Digital clocks will be located at miles 1 and 10 to enable runners to  check their splits. The course is USA Track and Field certified (#NH1015WN) and sanctioned. Strict traffic control is promised. Race organizers will have live music and entertainment along the course to keep you going. The course closes at 12:00 noon, and after that time, no course safety or water stop service will be available. Personal baggage and a change of clothes will be transported from the  start to the finish.
     Water stops will be located at approximately miles 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12, plus the start and finish. A sport drink, Nutfield Spring Water, and Carb-BOOM energy gels, bandaids and Vaseline will be available.  The stops will be staffed by the best volunteers around trying to take home the "Big Lake Battle" first prize. "Imagine running through a tiki hut or tropical oasis. Imagine these people cheering YOU on. All water stops will be competing for prizes and cash in the Big Lake Battle. The most creative and spirited squad wins. Live music and entertainment along the course will keep you going."
     Special awards will be given to the top three male and female winners overall. Awards will be given to the top three in the following age group:  15-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, and 70 over. Special awards will also be given to the top three Clydesdales (men 200+ lbs.) and Athenas (women 140+ lbs.) overall. A  special keepsake will be given to all finishers of the race, and they will also receive a great multi-color Big Lake T-shirt when they turn in their ChampionChip. Cash awards go to the top five male and female finishers overall.
     After the race, you can enjoy yourself at the Big Lake Bash Party in the Bay with live music by the Holy Cows on the Alton Bay Bandstand. Domino's Pizza, Jordan's Ice Cream, Stonyfield Farm Yogurt, and Pepsi will be offering a complimentary feast for all of the runner; a special raffle takes place along with the awards ceremony.
     A massage tent providing massage, active release techniques, and chiropractic techniques will be provided by Summit Rehabilitation and Arvidson Chiropractic Center. All services are complimentary for the participants. 
     The entry fee $25.00, with a late fee of $5 for entries received after April 2, 2002. There will be no race-day registration available. The field is limited to 1200 runners. For more information, contact Keith at (603)-293-8353 or e-mail him at keith@timbermantri.com. To enter online or to print out and mail in a paper application with payment, go to: www.Lin-Mark.com/biglakeinfo.htm. Checkout the race Web site at: www.timbermantri.com/biglake.htm. Fifty-two runners have already registered.
     The second Albany Breakfast Run of the season takes place on Sunday, January 6. It begins at 9:00 a.m. from the Last Resort Inn of Pat Fry and Gary Howard. Don't forget to bring a potluck dish. Various routes can be run depending on your mood for the morning. The Bald Hill loop is the standard one, averaging around 6.2 miles. It starts in front of the Albany Breakfast Clubhouse and heads out to the Darby Field Inn. From Darby Field, the run heads for the Kanc and a scenic tour along the Swift River as we turn east and back to Conway and Route 16. The first five miles are mostly flat with just a few short downhills. For more
information call 447-1974. Will January's run break the all-time attendance record that was nearly shattered at the December run? Until next week, I hope to see you, on theDecember 28, 2001


      Central Maine Technical College together with the Central Maine Striders are sponsoring a running clinic on Sunday, January 13. A continuous series of workshops will run from 8:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. According to workshop director Mike Bridges, "The workshop is designed for runners of all ages and levels looking to improve their knowledge and performance. You will be learning from some of the most successful running and track professionals in the business. We are planning a variety of workshops where you get to pick and choose what presentations to attend." Workshop topics include: proper stretching techniques, foot care, knee injury prevention, bio-mechanics, nutrition and diet concerns for runners, fabrication and the goal of a custom fit orthotic, continuous warm-up drills, sports psychology, lactate testing for coaches, trainers and athletes, choosing the proper gear, strength training for runners, the philosophy of training and competition, and a question and answer panel of running professionals to wrap-up the day. Central Maine Technical College is located on 1250 Turner Street in Auburn. The best way to get there is to take the Maine Turnpike. The Auburn exit is right after the Gray, Maine, exit. The cost of the clinic is $55, a real bargain for an all-day affair. For more information, give Mike a call at: (207) 755-5251 or e-mail him at: cmathletics@hotmail.com. If you leave your name and mailing address, Mike will send you a brochure detailing all the day's features. 

     Don't forget about the 3rd Annual Union Leader & New Hampshire Sunday News Millennium Mile on Sunday, December 30. The race gets underway at 2:00 p.m. in Londonderry, NH. Registration takes place at the Londonderry High School gym from noon until 1:45 p.m. and is $10 on race-day. Runners of all ages and abilities are invited to participate.  T-shirts go to the the first 150 entries. A kids' fun run is also scheduled with the entry fee only $1 and is open to kids under 12. T-shirts go to the first 100 entries. Prize money will be awarded to the top three male and female finishers in the open race. Gift certificates, awards, and merchandise will be given to the top three runners in each age group. Post-race refreshments, awards, music, and festivities will be held at Mack's Apples Farm. The course is on a one-mile stretch of Mammoth Road in Londonderry and is considered to have a downhill advantage. For more information, go to the race's Web site at: www.movinshoesmadison.com/millennium_mile.htm or e-mail John at: jmortiii@hotmail.com.

     On the Track. Speed workouts are held every Thursday at 5:15 p.m. at Settlers Green. Meet behind the hotel at the far end of the parking lot near the Fairway Road. The hearty group of speed demons that show up each week have been running 400m repeats with a three minute rest interval between repeats. Everyone runs at their own 400m pace but with the incentive of trying to stay with the runner just ahead of you.  Anyone (especially newcomers) interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. No experience is necessary. The Dartmouth Relays are coming up in early January. If you have any questions about the relays or want more information about the speed work, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626.
"Speedwork, who needs that. I'd rather sit here on the couch and eat Christmas cookies." And after espousing his guest with this bit of running wisdom, Marc Chauvin plopped himself down on his throne and downed a half dozen more cookies. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.           

 

December 14, 2001      

     The Annual White Mountain Milers' Christmas Party takes place on Sunday, December 16. Everything gets underway at high noon with a run from the Dowlings' house. Various routes and distances can be chosen. It is great way to reminisce about past runs and what the weather was like.  Don't forget to bring a potluck dish for the party. The food is always fabulous. The famous Yankee Swap follows the meal. What will this year bring, Spam t-shirts, Gary Howard's framed photo, a pair of the famous "shorts", the skull, worthless junk only the Earl of Stetson would want, or something new and even more bizarre? Will Santa Claus make an appearance? Hope to see you there.

     On the Track. Speed workouts are held every Thursday at 5:15 p.m. at Settlers Green. Meet behind the hotel at the far end of the parking lot near the Fairway Road. The hearty group of speed demons that show up each week have been running 400m repeats with a three minute rest interval between repeats. Everyone runs at their own 400m pace but with the incentive of trying to stay with the runner just ahead of you.  Anyone (especially newcomers) interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. No experience is necessary. The Dartmouth Relays are coming up in early January. If you have any questions about the relays or want more information about the speed work, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626.

     Winter is always a difficult time to maintain your training. Sometimes I find myself struggling with all the reasons not to run rather than just suiting up and heading out the door. The spring race season seems so far away in December and January. I've decided to keep myself motivated by targeting two races to run this winter. The first is the 3rd Annual Union Leader & New Hampshire Sunday News Millennium Mile on Sunday, December 30. The race gets underway at 2:00 p.m. in Londonderry, NH. Runners of all ages and abilities are invited to participate. John Mortimer, former Londonderry High School cross country and track star, is the race's founder and director. Mortimer went on to a stellar career at the University of Michigan where he earned all-American honors.

Registration is $7 before the race and $10 on rac-day. T-shirts go the the first 150 entries. Registration takes place at  the Londonderry High School gym from noon until 1:45. New this year is a kids' fun run. The entry fee is only $1 and is open to kids under 12. T-shirts go to the first 100 entries. Prize money will be awarded to the top three male and female finishers in the open race. Gift certificates, awards, and merchandise will be given to the top three runners in each age group. Post-race refreshments, awards, music, and festivities will be held at Mack's Apples Farm. The course is on a one-mile stretch of Mammoth Road in Londonderry and is considered to have a downhill advantage. For more information, checkout the race's Web site at: www.movinshoesmadison.com/millennium_mile.htm or e-mail John at: jmortiii@hotmail.com.

     Two other races to checkout this winter are the 7th Annual Boston Prep 16 Miler on Sunday, January 27, 2002, in Derry, NH, and the Maine Track Club's 21st Annual Mid-Winter 10 Mile Classic on Sunday, February 3. I'm setting my sights on the Mid-Winter Classic in Cape Elizabeth. It will tell me what kind of shape I'm in after two solid months of training. I'll have more about both races in future columns.

   Finally, if setting the goal of a winter race is not to your liking or not enough of a challenge to keep you motivated, then hook-up with a training partner and agree to meet  several times each week for a run, a weekend long run is a great idea. How about a full moon run? Running with a partner has gotten me through many a long run, and before you know it, it's done, and you'll be planning next week's.
          
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers For he who sheds his blood with me today Shall be my brother.  -Shakespeare, Henry V

Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.           

December 7, 2001      

     
     Twenty-seven runners attended the first Albany Breakfast Run of the season on Sunday, December 2. The run was  dedicated in memory of Jim Cataldo who recently passed away. Gary Howard reminded us all that Jim was one of the original members of the White Mountain Milers who competed in numerous races during his long running career. Thank you to Gary and Pat for hosting the run and to everyone that attended and ran in honor of Jim.

     September and October running weather in the month of December, not many people would have predicted that, but I welcome this kind of weather right now. You see, I don't want it to end. This is perfect weather for training, if only the days were longer. I do like the snow, but I am enjoying this. It got me thinking to what it would be like to train during a winter with this kind of weather, no ice, good footing, the chance for true speedwork all winter long. I know it won't last. The snow and the cold will come. I'll adapt and even like it. I refuse to head indoors and run on a treadmill. Unless you're in rehab, I don't see why anyone living in our area would want to run on a treadmill indoors. Running is too much of a holistic, natural thing to be confined to a rubber sidewalk in a heath club. Indoor track, now that's different animal, no need to worry about that up here though. So, before winter sets in, and it will, get out and enjoy the weather. Hit the trails. With just a little elevation gain, you'll be surprised at all the secret vistas that show up this time of year. Wear some hunter orange, but you probably won't run into many hunters if you head uphill. Those that you do are pretty serious about their sport and know what they're doing and can tell the difference between a deer and a runner. A run in the woods is always better than a run on pavement. The White Mountain National Forest is your playground. Be a kid again; go play in the woods. Hope to see you there.        

On the Track. Speed workouts are held every Thursday at 5:15 p.m. at Settlers Green. Meet behind the hotel at the far end of the parking lot near the Fairway Road. The hearty group of speed demons that show up each week have been running 400m repeats with a three minute rest interval between repeats. Everyone runs at their own 400m pace but with the incentive of trying to stay with the runner just ahead of you.  Anyone (especially newcomers) interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. No experience is necessary. The Dartmouth Relays are coming up in early January. If you have any questions about the relays or want more information about the speed work, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626.
White Mountain Miler Race News.  If you participate in a race, give me a call with the results at 284-6903, e-mail me at:  ajviens@lr.net, or send them by snail mail to 60 Trask Hill Rd., North Sandwich, NH 03259. Thanks for your help.  

     Finally, just when you think all the gossip, lies, and rumors that Milers are famous for are winding down for the year, a gem pops up. According to a very reliable source, Kevin Callahan has perfected the art of slow running. All runners need to run slowly from time to time, but Kevin has made a science out of it. My source says that Callahan has tried and studied numerous methods regarding slow running. After carefully analyzing all of his slow runs this past summer, Kevin believes he is knowledgeable enough about slow running techniques to offer a course he calls the "Art of Slow Running." For more information, give Kevin a call before Runner's World gets wind of him and he becomes more famous than he already is. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.           

 

 

November 30, 2001      

     
     The first Albany Breakfast Run of the season takes place on Sunday, December 2. This run is being dedicated in memory of Jim Cataldo who recently passed away. Jim was one of the original members of the White Mountain Milers. Jim competed in numerous races during his long running career. He was an especially tenacious competitor when it came to half marathons and marathons. He had been training since last spring to get ready for our half marathon this year. All friends and acquaintances of Jim, runners and nonrunners alike, are invited to attend the run or just the potluck breakfast to honor Jim's spirit and love of running.
     Things get underway at 9:00 a.m. from the Last Resort Inn of Pat Fry, Gary Howard, and Daisy Dog. Don't forget to bring a potluck dish; breakfast begins at the conclusion of the run between 10:15 to 10:30 a.m. Various routes can be run depending on your mood for the morning. The Bald Hill loop is the standard one, averaging around 6.2 miles. It starts in front of the Albany Breakfast Clubhouse and heads out to the Darby Field Inn. From Darby Field, the run heads for the Kanc and a scenic tour along the Swift River as we turn east and back to Conway and Route 16. The first five miles are mostly flat with just a few short downhills. For more information call 447-1974.
     As probably already know, White Mountain Miler Barbara Robinson was recently inducted into the New England Runners 65+ Hall of Fame. Barbara was both thrilled and humbled by this great honor and now more than ever wants to return to running and training. I am glad to report that Barbara is running again and had this to say:  "I am running almost exclusively at long last! It has been a real struggle and I won't bore you with the details other than to say that I had more surgery on my shoulder (stabilization procedure) in June. At this tender age, nothing's easy, but I feel that I have turned the corner and hope to resume competition next year. My pace is turtle-like at the moment, but I'm finally running about 30 miles a week. I miss my running friends and the camaraderie of racing, but if all goes well, I'll see everyone in the spring." And yes Barbara, it will be good to have you back. See you at the Ammonoosuc Amble in April.   
On the Track. Speed workouts are held every Thursday at 5:15 p.m. at Settlers Green. Meet behind the hotel at the far end of the parking lot near the Fairway Road. The hearty group of speed demons that show up each week have been running 400m repeats with a three minute rest interval between repeats. Everyone runs at their own 400m pace but with the incentive of trying to stay with the runner just ahead of you.  Anyone (especially newcomers) interested in learning more about speed workouts, racing faster, or enjoying a higher level of fitness should attend. No experience is necessary. The Dartmouth Relays are coming up in early January. If you have any questions about the relays or want more information about the speed work, contact Bernie Livingston at 447-6626.
White Mountain Miler Race News.  If you participate in a race, give me a call with the results at 284-6903, e-mail me at:  ajviens@lr.net, or send them by snail mail to 60 Trask Hill Rd., North Sandwich, NH 03259. Thanks for your help.  
     "The only wall Benoit ever hit was the outfield fence with a double in the gap at the Bowdoin alumni day softball game." -Amby Burfoot, on Joan Benoit Samuelson. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.           

November 23, 2001      

     The team of Rick Copley, Julie Finch, and Josh Fawson captured first place in the Turkey Raffle Relay on Saturday, November 17. Their combined time was 60:26 for an 18:44 average per 5K leg. This race was over before it began when this team was picked. Finch and Fawson both are runners for the Kennett Eagles cross country team, and Rick Copley provided some speed that was not bad for the old man of the group. In second place was the team of Phil Ostroski, Tim Livingston and Heather Trillium with a combined time of 68:34. In the individual race, Cathy Livingston was first for the women with a time of 20:03. Other women in the top five included: 2. Andrea Masters, 22:53; 3. Sally McMurdo, 23:09; 4. Julie Finch, 23:23; 5. Michelle Low, 23:31. Tim Livingston was first in the men's field with a time of 17:13. Rounding out the top five were: 2. Rick Copley, 18:19; 3. Josh Fawson, 18:44; 4. AJ Viens, 20:54; 5. Tim Rickett, 21:32.
     Lorraine Tilney and David Freedman teamed up and placed first in the walkers' division. Lorraine completed the course with a time of 36:03 and David with a time of 28:55. The team of Karen Stancik and Lucille Russo finished in second place. Karen finished in 35:19 and Lucille in 37:23. Congratulations to everyone that competed in this year's relay. Thank you to Chris Misavage and Nancy Fredrickson for hosting the race. Thank you to Barb Renda, Lucille Russo, and Chris and Nancy for roasting the turkeys. Kevin Callahan slaved all day in the kitchen to prepare his sumptuous soup. Thank you to all the folks that baked a dessert or two. Once again, a good time was had by all.
White Mountain Miler Race News White Mountain Miler Ed Martin made the long trek from the North Country to compete in last Saturday's Portsmouth Jingle Bell 10K. Ed finished 241 out of 300, with a time of 57:49 and 29 out of 31 runners in the always competitive 50-59 age group. Ed had this to say: "Given how little I have run since Mount Wash, I was quite pleased. Perfect day-sunny, temps in the upper 40s, light breeze, and a beautiful course."       
     Paul Kirsch ran the Green Mountain Marathon in South Hero, VT,  on  October 20. It was his first-ever marathon. Paul said, "It was a gorgeous course with over half of it on dirt roads right along Lake Champlain. I was disappointed with my time, but it was a great learning experience. It made me realize I need to do my long runs at a faster pace than I've been doing." Paul finished 73 out of 143 runners with a time of 4:01:53.
     Linda Waitkun won the women's masters division at the Bay State Marathon on October 21. She had a time of 3:21:02 and placed 131 out of 750 runners. According to Kevin Callahan, Bob Parrish, who was running the half marathon at Bay State, said he could beat Linda's time at the half. He didn't but did manage to run a 1:36:02 placing him 152 out of 1331 and 9 out of 65 in his age division. No Miler trains harder for a marathon than Linda Waitkun. She loves that distance. Her time at Bay State will probably move her starting position up at Boston for 2002.
     Barb and John Renda both successfully race walked the Chicago Marathon on Sunday, October 7. Barb is a veteran of several marathons, but I believe this was John's first, and he has developed marathon fever. The duo from Albany is training for a second race walk marathon in spring 2002. John wants to lower his time. Barb announced a special race walking clinic to be offered by a prominent nationally known race walker. If you are interested in this special weekend clinic, then give her a call at: 447-8933. Congratulations to Barb and John, Ed, Linda, Bob, and Paul. If you participate in a race, give me a call with the results at 284-6903, e-mail me at:  ajviens@lr.net, or send them by snail mail to 60 Trask Hill Rd., North Sandwich, NH 03259. Thanks for your help.  
     Finally, I'd like to leave you with this quote for the week. "I think Marc's ('Chauvin that is') home on the couch." Kevin Callahan said, "Maybe he's afraid of racing me." Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.           

October 26, 2001      
         
    
     If the Run for the Pie a la Mode 5K Race on Sunday, October 21 is any indication, Tim Livingston is primed and ready for the 16th Annual White Mountain Milers Half Marathon slated to take place this Sunday. Livingston just completed one of his most successful summers of racing and is still going strong. Rick Copley, Josh Fawson, and Josh McKay all challenged Livingston at the start of the race. The quick start pushed Copley and Livingston to the first mile in 5:31. As the pace quickened even more, Fawson and McKay faded, and that left just Tim and Rick to duel it out. With a little more than a mile to go, Tim challenged with a surge that in the end could not be met by Rick. Tim captured first place with a time of 16:31 and Rick finished second with a time of 17:35. Josh Fawson held on to third in 18:12. Dan Doherty ran a great race finishing fourth in 18:42 and successfully caught and passed his much younger opponent, Josh McKay who finished fifth with a time of 19:07. Heather Robinson was the first woman in with a time of 21:09 and seventh overall. Kara Jacobs finished second in the women's division in 21:29. Andrea Masters was the third women to finish displaying an amazing finishing kick that had Kevin Callahan eating her dust as she rounded the corner for home. Callahan was a defeated man by the shoes of a master. Linda Kearney and Dave Freedman were the winning walkers. A special congratulations to Charlea Copley who competed in her first cross country race ever. She finished 23rd overall with a time of 31:15. With this race and a triathlon under your belt, Mount Washington is calling you.
     Once again, the weather cooperated for race director Bob Benes. The course was perfect. There is no better place to run a cross country event on a Sunday in October than the Run for the Pie a la Mode. Kudos to you Bob. The proceeds from the race benefited the East Conway Fire Department and the White Mountain Milers Community Track Fund. Thank you to all the businesses that provided raffle prizes: Green Thumb Farms, Deschambeaults Greenhouse, Sherman's Farm Stand, Jessy's Country Store, Town & Country, and Swett Brother's Farm, and thank you to folks who provided the live music. I know I'll be back next year.
     The 16th Annual White Mountain Milers Half Marathon takes place on Sunday, October 28. The race starts at 8:00 a.m. for walkers and 10:00 a.m. for runners. The field includes more than 300 runners and walkers. Race director Donna Cormier and her crew have everything in place and ready to go.
     The 13.1 mile out and back course is considered a fair one. It is fast for those trained and eager to set a PR. Granite State Race Services under the direction of Bob Teschek provides all the timing. The course record and the NH State Record for a certified half marathon were set by Dave Dunham in 1989 with a time of 1:05:42:84 and Julie Peterson in 1995 with a time of 1:17:56:46.
     New to the race this year is the site for Saturday's number pickup on Saturday, October, 27, from 4:00 to 6:30 p.m. at the Reverence for Life Building on Route 16 adjacent to the First Congregational Church. The Eastern Slope Inn is the place to go for your number on Sunday morning from 7:00 to 9:15 a.m. Remember, runners and walkers must pick up their own numbers.

     All White Mountain Milers and anyone else that would like to help out are reminded that donations of cookies, brownies, and other desserts are needed for the post-race meal on Sunday afternoon. Food can be dropped off at the John Fuller School from 8:00 to 11:00 a.m. on the day of the race. 

    Everyone connected with the race is reminded about the pasta dinner on Saturday, October 27, from 5:00 to 7:30 p.m. at the First Congregational Church on Route 16 in North Conway Village. The price is $6.00 if you preregistered or $7 at the door. Entrants, volunteers, families, and friends are welcome. All members of the White Mountain Milers are urged to attend.

For those runners and walkers who are not racing, there is still a chance to be involved as a volunteer. More than 100 volunteers are needed to stage this event. As a volunteer, you will receive a long sleeve T-shirt, entry into the post-race raffle, and a free meal ticket for after the race. If you are interested in being a part of one of New England's top fifty road races, give Donna Cormier, a call at 603-356-6865. Without the help of all the volunteers, the half marathon would not be possible.  Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.           


October 19, 2001      
         
     Last week I wrote about the outstanding performance of the Kennett High Cross Country Team. This week's news comes from the Fryeburg Academy Cross Country Team. Head coach Bill Reilly is seeing nothing but green as in pay dirt as the lady harriers of Fryeburg upset the number one team in the state, Greely, to take first place in a meet held in Fryeburg on Friday, October 12. Going into the meet, Fryeburg was  ranked number six in the All Schools Division in Maine.  The final score was: Fryeburg 28, Greely 29. I hope Coach Reilly was not wearing his heart rate monitor. Mary Rhoads led the way for the Raiders and captured first place over the 3.1 mile hilly course.  Mary also set a new course record with her 20:11 finishing time.  The Raiders, running with all their heart and soul, took fourth, fifth, and sixth place. Stephanie Jette was fourth in 20:44, just 33 seconds behind Mary. Next was Joanna Kinsman in fifth with a time of 21:38 followed by Mariah Whitney in sixth place in 21:52. Other runners for Fryeburg included: 13. Chelsea Tryder, 22:50; 19. Naomi Risch, 24:25; 25. Jen Plowden, 25:09; 30. Julie Wagner, 26:23; 36. Adriana Litova, 27:16; 37. Natalia Weilgosz 27:19; 42. Rositsa Atanasova, 28:13; and 50. Hailey Dyer, 30:34. Congratulations to Fryeburg Girls Cross Country Team and their coaches, Bill Reilly and Dawn Hunt.

     The Run for the Pie a la Mode 5K Race is set to take place on Sunday, October 21. The proceeds from the race will benefit the East Conway Fire Department and the White Mountain Milers Community Track Fund. The race starts at 11:00 a.m. at Benes Homestead (formerly Barnside Homemade Ice Cream) located at 3055 East Conway Road.
     Race day registration begins at 9:30 a.m. The walkers' race starts at 10:30 a.m. The entry fee is $12. Pies go to the first 50 who register. Race director Bob Benes says that this is a real cross country course "run on rough, possibly muddy, flat terrain through corn fields." Pie and ice cream will be served to all participants. Raffle prizes and live music are also part of the complete race package. Sponsors include: Green Thumb Farms, Deschambeaults Greenhouse, Sherman's Farm Stand, Jessy's Country Store, Town & Country, and Swett Brother's Farm.  A pie baking contest will be held in conjunction with the race. The Benes Homestead is located between Sherman's Farmstand and Jessy's Country Store. For more information, contact race director Bob Benes at:  (603) 939-3000.

For the Fun of It. The last fun run of the season takes place on Tuesday, October 23, at 5:00 p.m. The course winds for 3.1 miles on soft trails through the woods. Walkers and runners of all abilities are invited to meet at the John Fuller School in North Conway. This will also be the last cleanup of the season on River Road. Cleanup coordinator Gretchen Plender is asking everyone to run at 5:00 p.m. so that the cleanup can begin at 5:30 p.m. and finish before darkness. For more information, give Gretchen a call at 447-8446.

     Although I don't have any results yet, a number of Milers were planning on running fall marathons. Megan Henderson ran the Columbus Marathon on September 22. Barb and John Renda successfully finished the Chicago Marathon. Linda Waitkun headed to the Bay State Marathon this past weekend. Bob Parrish was slated to run too but the half rather than the full marathon. Diane Bilotta and Linda Eldridge ran in the Tufts 10K the same weekend that they raced in Portland, Maine. Lorraine Tilney and Lucille Russo just can't get enough speedwork on Thursday nights. Both are race walking our half marathon later this month. Lorraine's speedwork over past three months paid off handsomely for her at the Tufts 10K this year. She lowered her time by over seven minutes from last year. Congratulations to Lorraine and Lucille and all our runners and walkers.

     Besides his coaching duties, Bill Reilly is gearing up for the White Mountain Milers Half Marathon on October 28. On September 23, he ran the Tukey Trot 10K in Portland, finishing 8th out of 264 with a time of 37:08, good enough for first place in the 50-59 age group. Next came the Cornish Apple Blossom 5K on September 29, finishing first overall in a time of 18:18. Finally, on October 14, Billy traveled south to the Apple Harvest 5-Miler in West Newbury, MA. Bill placed 5th out of 289 runners with a time of 29:39. This also earned him first place honors in his age group. Congratulations Billy. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.           
     

October 12, 2001      
         
      Katie Gwyther ran away from the field on Saturday, October 6, at the Kennett Invitational Cross Country Meet. Katie easily captured first place in the varsity race for girls. She completed the 3.1 mile course in 19:21 and set a PR for herself. Holly Bales of Plymouth was second in 20:02, and Andrea Newton of Berlin was third in 20:50.
     The Kingswood Knights girls took first place honors with 36 points. Coach Carl Mitchell has to be pleased with his team's performance. Scoring for Knights was Jillian LaRosa, 4th (21:06); Alissa Leone, 5th (21:14); Moselle Spiller, 6th (21:58), Nicole Levesque, 8th (22:19); and Kristy Morgan, 13th (23:20).
     The Kennett girls finished second with 53 points. Scoring for the Eagles along with Katie Gwyther were Julie Finch, 9th (22:33); Emily Eastman, 11th (23:11); Sarah Fortin, 15th (23:38); Sarah Morrison, 17th (23:46); and Sarah Phillips, 19th (23:51). Berlin finished third with 56 points followed by Plymouth in fourth with 72 points.
     In the boys race, the Kennett harriers finished third with 74 points. Berlin placed first with 31 points led by James Sullivan who finished first overall with a time of 17:28. Laconia was second with 32 points, and Plymouth rounded out the field in fourth with 105 points.
The following runners scored for Kennett in the varsity race: Josh Fossum, 6th (18:26); Josh McKay, 16th (19:24); Ron Smith, 17th (19:31); Jamie Shanks, 20th (20:03); Colin Ashe, 23rd (20:12); and Jay Spencer, 27th (22:32).
     Kingswood did not field a boys team, but that didn't stop the outstanding performance of Zach Lampron who finished third with a time of 17:38. Other Kingswood harriers included Mike Martel, 18th (19:36) and Phil Saltmarsh, 25th (20:59).
     Coach Tim Livingston's junior high team ran their hearts out at their only home meet of the season with the boys taking first place with 27 points and the girls second place with 35 points. Erik Andersen raced to a first place finish, completing the 2-mile course in 13:39. Terry Stackhouse of Kingswood was third in 13:56.
     Any coach would be pleased with one first place finish as Livingston certainly was. But by the time the girls' race was over, Kennett had another first place finish. Kristin Hollum took first place with a time of 14:28 and Coach Livingston was a happy man, two first place finishers for his team at their home meet. The Kennett Junior High girls finished in second place with 35 points. Kingswood, led by Sarah LaRosa, 2nd (14:32) and Dena Saltmarsh, 3rd (14:45) captured the first place trophy with 30 points.
     One hundred twenty-one runners made the Kennett Invitational a huge success. Kudos to coaches Bernie and Tim Livingston who made sure that everything was organized and in place for a successful home meet. The course was first-rate not only for the runners but also for the spectators. Over 70% of the race could be viewed by the crowd. What a treat that must be for any parent that had a runner racing. Coach Livingston extends his thanks to the volunteers: Dick Fedion, Eileen Livingston, Kim Livingston, John Hancock, Cathy Livingston, Kevin Tilton, Kristen Martindale, Kara Jacobs, and Carol Viens. Without these volunteers, the meet would not have been possible. A special thank you to Glass Graphics of Conway who provided all the special awards that had the runners and spectators oohing and ahing.      
     The White Mountain Milers Half Marathon is only two weeks away. Race committee member Diane Bilotta asks anyone who travels West Side Road or lives nearby to please take a few minutes to fill up a trash bag. "Let's try to have the race course litter free by Sunday, October 28." All White Mountain Milers and friends of Milers are asked to bake or buy some cookies, brownies, or other desserts for the post-race refreshments. Desserts should be brought to the John Fuller School on the morning of the race, October 28. Finally, if you are not running the race, volunteers are needed at the start, on the course, at the finish, and preparing and serving the post-race meal to the runners and walkers. If you are interested in volunteering, give race director Donna Cormier a call at (207) 697-3244. If you have any other questions about the clean-up or baking for the race, give Diane Headphones Bilotta a call at (603) 356-8902.        
     The Run For the Pie Richard Solomon Memorial 5K Race takes place on Sunday, October 21, at 11:00 a.m. in East Conway, NH, at the site of the former Barnside Homemade Ice Cream. I'll have all the particulars for you next week about this first class event. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.           



October 5, 2001      
    
    
     Blues skies, autumn leaves, and fifty cent weather made last weekend perfect for a trail run, and the Rob Brook Road area located off of Bear Notch Road is a must-run for anyone looking for the best this area has to offer in off-road runs. Mountain bikers and cross country skiers have long known the secrets of this area. It is about time that runners discover this jewel too. Even if you are not a trail runner, the area has one of the best fire roads the United States Forest Service has ever built. It's so smooth that you can run it with your eyes closed. I wouldn't recommend that however, because you might end up kissing a moose. Moose are entering the rutting season this time of year, and it's best to keep your eyes open and take in the foliage. If you're adventuresome, head off Rob Brook Trail onto one of the numerous single track side trails. Rob Brook Trail is one of my favorites. Beware though, some of these side trails will get you down and dirty, but that's half the fun of trail running. Besides, you can always take a dip in the Swift River; cold water removes caked-on mud better than anything. There are so many trail possibilities in this area, that unless you do an out-and-back, I recommend getting a map of the area. One of the best ones is a mountain bike map produced by Peter Minnich. Miler and AMC cartographer Larry Garland did the GPS and map work. It's a wonderful resource. Mileage is accurate, and the map shows both trails and fire roads. The map is sold ($9-10) at area bike shops and the Saco River Ranger Station located at the beginning of the Kanc in Conway. If you want to have a chance of seeing some wildlife, try an early morning run. Don't be afraid to get wet and muddy; it's more fun that way. After the run, take a plunge in Swift to get the mud off, and no, you won't catch cold swimming in October. Then, head on back to Conway for breakfast at the Chinook Cafe. I don't know of a better way to spend a Saturday or Sunday morning on the run.

     Congratulations to Katie Gwyther on her outstanding performance at the Manchester Invitational Cross Country Meet at Manchester's Derryfield Park on Saturday, September 29. Katie finished second in the girls small schools race with a time of 19:38. This meet brings together  high school runners from all over New England. Over 2300 runners were entered in Saturday's meet. Schools compete in one of three divisions: elite, large school, and small school. If you take Katie's time and place it among the elite girls, she would have earned herself a 7th place finish overall among the best girls in New England. And, she would have tied for first place in the girls large school division. Way to go Katie. Are you a White Mountain Miler, yet? We need young runners like you and Kevin Tilton in the club. 

October 5, 2001      
    
    
     Blues skies, autumn leaves, and fifty cent weather made last weekend perfect for a trail run, and the Rob Brook Road area located off of Bear Notch Road is a must-run for anyone looking for the best this area has to offer in off-road runs. Mountain bikers and cross country skiers have long known the secrets of this area. It is about time that runners discover this jewel too. Even if you are not a trail runner, the area has one of the best fire roads the United States Forest Service has ever built. It's so smooth that you can run it with your eyes closed. I wouldn't recommend that however, because you might end up kissing a moose. Moose are entering the rutting season this time of year, and it's best to keep your eyes open and take in the foliage. If you're adventuresome, head off Rob Brook Trail onto one of the numerous single track side trails. Rob Brook Trail is one of my favorites. Beware though, some of these side trails will get you down and dirty, but that's half the fun of trail running. Besides, you can always take a dip in the Swift River; cold water removes caked-on mud better than anything. There are so many trail possibilities in this area, that unless you do an out-and-back, I recommend getting a map of the area. One of the best ones is a mountain bike map produced by Peter Minnich. Miler and AMC cartographer Larry Garland did the GPS and map work. It's a wonderful resource. Mileage is accurate, and the map shows both trails and fire roads. The map is sold ($9-10) at area bike shops and the Saco River Ranger Station located at the beginning of the Kanc in Conway. If you want to have a chance of seeing some wildlife, try an early morning run. Don't be afraid to get wet and muddy; it's more fun that way. After the run, take a plunge in Swift to get the mud off, and no, you won't catch cold swimming in October. Then, head on back to Conway for breakfast at the Chinook Cafe. I don't know of a better way to spend a Saturday or Sunday morning on the run.

     Congratulations to Katie Gwyther on her outstanding performance at the Manchester Invitational Cross Country Meet at Manchester's Derryfield Park on Saturday, September 29. Katie finished second in the girls small schools race with a time of 19:38. This meet brings together  high school runners from all over New England. Over 2300 runners were entered in Saturday's meet. Schools compete in one of three divisions: elite, large school, and small school. If you take Katie's time and place it among the elite girls, she would have earned herself a 7th place finish overall among the best girls in New England. And, she would have tied for first place in the girls large school division. Way to go Katie. Are you a White Mountain Miler, yet? We need young runners like you and Kevin Tilton in the club. 

     Don't forget to come out and support the Kennett High Eagle harriers as they host their only home meet of the season on Saturday, October 6, behind Kennett High School. The meet begins at 11:00 a.m. Plymouth, Laconia, Berlin, Kingswood, St. Thomas, and Merrimack Valley are expected to field teams. Coach Bernie Livingston is looking for volunteers to help with the meet or for people to bake cookies, brownies, or cup cakes for post-race refreshments. Baked goods can be dropped off on race-day anytime before 11:00 a.m. For more information, give Coach Livingston a call at: 447-6626.

     According to MJ Britton, World Run Day will be celebrated in North Fryeburg, Maine, on November 11, at 8:00 a.m. You can run the distance of your choice and make a donation to the charity of your choice. For more information, give MJ a call at (207)697-3593 or checkout www.runday.com

     Thank you to Pam and Bob Fisher for hosting another Zucchini Run at their Potter Road Estate in September. The Fishers have the hosting duties down to the very last detail that they don't even have to be present for things to still run smoothly. Linda and Earl Stetson graciously filled in as guest hosts. If the Fishers are not back by now, something tells me that Earl probably found a new home; an old Yankee adage says, if it ain't been lived in for three days, it's mine.    

For the Fun of It. Weekly fun runs are held every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. The course winds for 3.1 miles on soft trails through the woods. Walkers and runners of all abilities are invited to meet at the John Fuller School in North Conway. Here's your chance to meet people from all walks of life and abilities who are bound by their common interest in fitness. Weekly fun runs continue throughout the season until the end of October.        

     "Stadiums are for spectators. We runners have nature and that is much better." -Juha Vaatainen, winner of the 5,000 and 10,000 meter races in the 1971 European Championships. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.

 
October 12, 2001      
         
      Katie Gwyther ran away from the field on Saturday, October 6, at the Kennett Invitational Cross Country Meet. Katie easily captured first place in the varsity race for girls. She completed the 3.1 mile course in 19:21 and set a PR for herself. Holly Bales of Plymouth was second in 20:02, and Andrea Newton of Berlin was third in 20:50.
     The Kingswood Knights girls took first place honors with 36 points. Coach Carl Mitchell has to be pleased with his team's performance. Scoring for Knights was Jillian LaRosa, 4th (21:06); Alissa Leone, 5th (21:14); Moselle Spiller, 6th (21:58), Nicole Levesque, 8th (22:19); and Kristy Morgan, 13th (23:20).
     The Kennett girls finished second with 53 points. Scoring for the Eagles along with Katie Gwyther were Julie Finch, 9th (22:33); Emily Eastman, 11th (23:11); Sarah Fortin, 15th (23:38); Sarah Morrison, 17th (23:46); and Sarah Phillips, 19th (23:51). Berlin finished third with 56 points followed by Plymouth in fourth with 72 points.
     In the boys race, the Kennett harriers finished third with 74 points. Berlin placed first with 31 points led by James Sullivan who finished first overall with a time of 17:28. Laconia was second with 32 points, and Plymouth rounded out the field in fourth with 105 points.
The following runners scored for Kennett in the varsity race: Josh Fossum, 6th (18:26); Josh McKay, 16th (19:24); Ron Smith, 17th (19:31); Jamie Shanks, 20th (20:03); Colin Ashe, 23rd (20:12); and Jay Spencer, 27th (22:32).
     Kingswood did not field a boys team, but that didn't stop the outstanding performance of Zach Lampron who finished third with a time of 17:38. Other Kingswood harriers included Mike Martel, 18th (19:36) and Phil Saltmarsh, 25th (20:59).
     Coach Tim Livingston's junior high team ran their hearts out at their only home meet of the season with the boys taking first place with 27 points and the girls second place with 35 points. Erik Andersen raced to a first place finish, completing the 2-mile course in 13:39. Terry Stackhouse of Kingswood was third in 13:56.
     Any coach would be pleased with one first place finish as Livingston certainly was. But by the time the girls' race was over, Kennett had another first place finish. Kristin Hollum took first place with a time of 14:28 and Coach Livingston was a happy man, two first place finishers for his team at their home meet. The Kennett Junior High girls finished in second place with 35 points. Kingswood, led by Sarah LaRosa, 2nd (14:32) and Dena Saltmarsh, 3rd (14:45) captured the first place trophy with 30 points.
     One hundred twenty-one runners made the Kennett Invitational a huge success. Kudos to coaches Bernie and Tim Livingston who made sure that everything was organized and in place for a successful home meet. The course was first-rate not only for the runners but also for the spectators. Over 70% of the race could be viewed by the crowd. What a treat that must be for any parent that had a runner racing. Coach Livingston extends his thanks to the volunteers: Dick Fedion, Eileen Livingston, Kim Livingston, John Hancock, Cathy Livingston, Kevin Tilton, Kristen Martindale, Kara Jacobs, and Carol Viens. Without these volunteers, the meet would not have been possible. A special thank you to Glass Graphics of Conway who provided all the special awards that had the runners and spectators oohing and ahing.      
     The White Mountain Milers Half Marathon is only two weeks away. Race committee member Diane Bilotta asks anyone who travels West Side Road or lives nearby to please take a few minutes to fill up a trash bag. "Let's try to have the race course litter free by Sunday, October 28." All White Mountain Milers and friends of Milers are asked to bake or buy some cookies, brownies, or other desserts for the post-race refreshments. Desserts should be brought to the John Fuller School on the morning of the race, October 28. Finally, if you are not running the race, volunteers are needed at the start, on the course, at the finish, and preparing and serving the post-race meal to the runners and walkers. If you are interested in volunteering, give race director Donna Cormier a call at (207) 697-3244. If you have any other questions about the clean-up or baking for the race, give Diane Headphones Bilotta a call at (603) 356-8902.        
     The Run For the Pie Richard Solomon Memorial 5K Race takes place on Sunday, October 21, at 11:00 a.m. in East Conway, NH, at the site of the former Barnside Homemade Ice Cream. I'll have all the particulars for you next week about this first class event. Until next week, I hope to see you, on the run.